Several studies have suggested that the phenolic fraction plays an important role during storage and therefore in the shelf life of virgin olive oil. This investigation examines the effect of freezing olives (–18 7C) before processing into oil on the transfer of the phenolic compounds into the subsequent oil, and the consequential changes in oxidative stability. Oil samples obtained from frozen olives (24 h at –18 7C), crushed with and without preliminary thawing, were compared to a control sample; both oils were obtained using a two-phase low-scale mill. The oxidative stability in different samples was assessed in terms of primary and secondary oxidation products as measured by peroxide values and oxidative stability index times, respectively. The quality of the oil samples was also checked through the percentage of free acidity and the phenolic content. Phenols were determined by both spectrophotometric assays (total phenols and o-diphenols) and HPLC-DAD/MSD. The antiradical capacity of the phenolic fraction was determined by DPPH and ABTS spectrophotometric tests. These analyses showed that thawing of olives before oil extraction led to a significant loss of oxidative stability and phenols; in contrast, samples obtained from frozen olives that were not thawed before crushing showed qualitative characteristics similar to control samples.

Effect of olive fruit freezing on oxidative stability of virgin olive oil

POERIO, ALBA;BENDINI, ALESSANDRA;CERRETANI, LORENZO;BONOLI, MATTEO;LERCKER, GIOVANNI
2008

Abstract

Several studies have suggested that the phenolic fraction plays an important role during storage and therefore in the shelf life of virgin olive oil. This investigation examines the effect of freezing olives (–18 7C) before processing into oil on the transfer of the phenolic compounds into the subsequent oil, and the consequential changes in oxidative stability. Oil samples obtained from frozen olives (24 h at –18 7C), crushed with and without preliminary thawing, were compared to a control sample; both oils were obtained using a two-phase low-scale mill. The oxidative stability in different samples was assessed in terms of primary and secondary oxidation products as measured by peroxide values and oxidative stability index times, respectively. The quality of the oil samples was also checked through the percentage of free acidity and the phenolic content. Phenols were determined by both spectrophotometric assays (total phenols and o-diphenols) and HPLC-DAD/MSD. The antiradical capacity of the phenolic fraction was determined by DPPH and ABTS spectrophotometric tests. These analyses showed that thawing of olives before oil extraction led to a significant loss of oxidative stability and phenols; in contrast, samples obtained from frozen olives that were not thawed before crushing showed qualitative characteristics similar to control samples.
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF LIPID SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
A. Poerio; A. Bendini; L. Cerretani; M. Bonoli-Carbognin; G. Lercker
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/60640
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