Intellectual disability in Down syndrome (DS) appears to be related to severe neurogenesis impairment during brain development. The molecular mechanisms underlying this defect are still largely unknown. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the importance of GSK3β signaling for neuronal precursor proliferation/differentiation. In neural precursor cells (NPCs) from Ts65Dn mice and human fetuses with DS, we found reduced GSK3β phosphorylation and, hence, increased GSK3β activity. In cultures of trisomic subventricular-zone-derived adult NPCs (aNPCs) we found that deregulation of GSK3β activity was due to higher levels of the AICD fragment of the trisomic gene APP that directly bound to GSK3β. We restored GSK3β phosphorylation in trisomic aNPCs using either lithium, a well-known GSK3β inhibitor, or using a 5-HT receptor agonist or fluoxetine, which activated the serotonin receptor 5-HT1A. Importantly, this effect was accompanied by restoration of proliferation, cell fate specification and neuronal maturation. In agreement with results obtained in vitro, we found that early treatment with fluoxetine, which was previously shown to rescue neurogenesis and behavior in Ts65Dn mice, restored GSK3β phosphorylation. These results provide a link between GSK3β activity alteration, APP triplication and the defective neuronal production that characterizes the DS brain. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying neurogenesis alterations in DS may help to devise therapeutic strategies, potentially usable in humans. Results suggest that drugs that increase GSK3β phosphorylation, such as lithium or fluoxetine, may represent useful tools for the improvement of neurogenesis in DS.

APP-dependent alteration of GSK3β activity impairs neurogenesis in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

TRAZZI, STEFANIA;FUCHS, CLAUDIA;DE FRANCESCHI, MARIANNA;BARTESAGHI, RENATA;CIANI, ELISABETTA
2014

Abstract

Intellectual disability in Down syndrome (DS) appears to be related to severe neurogenesis impairment during brain development. The molecular mechanisms underlying this defect are still largely unknown. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the importance of GSK3β signaling for neuronal precursor proliferation/differentiation. In neural precursor cells (NPCs) from Ts65Dn mice and human fetuses with DS, we found reduced GSK3β phosphorylation and, hence, increased GSK3β activity. In cultures of trisomic subventricular-zone-derived adult NPCs (aNPCs) we found that deregulation of GSK3β activity was due to higher levels of the AICD fragment of the trisomic gene APP that directly bound to GSK3β. We restored GSK3β phosphorylation in trisomic aNPCs using either lithium, a well-known GSK3β inhibitor, or using a 5-HT receptor agonist or fluoxetine, which activated the serotonin receptor 5-HT1A. Importantly, this effect was accompanied by restoration of proliferation, cell fate specification and neuronal maturation. In agreement with results obtained in vitro, we found that early treatment with fluoxetine, which was previously shown to rescue neurogenesis and behavior in Ts65Dn mice, restored GSK3β phosphorylation. These results provide a link between GSK3β activity alteration, APP triplication and the defective neuronal production that characterizes the DS brain. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying neurogenesis alterations in DS may help to devise therapeutic strategies, potentially usable in humans. Results suggest that drugs that increase GSK3β phosphorylation, such as lithium or fluoxetine, may represent useful tools for the improvement of neurogenesis in DS.
Trazzi S;Fuchs C;De Franceschi M;Mitrugno VM;Bartesaghi R;Ciani E
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/384309
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 14
  • Scopus 30
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 32
social impact