The aim of this research was to investigate the existing relationship and key related variables in the Italian health-care system. Although many studies have examined perceived inequity in work-place contexts, indicating job burnout as a main consequence, little research has focused on the moderator variable of this relationship. Here we also analyse whether or not perceived inequity could affect not only employee burnout but also positive outcomes such as engagement. We also set out to determine whether social support could moderate the relationship between perceived inequity and outcomes considered (burnout and engagement); and whether the work sector (public or private) and social support moderate the relationship between the perceived inequity and outcomes considered. 200 health care professionals, including social workers, medical practitioners and nurses, working in two different contexts, a public and a private hospital, were recruited for the study. All participants completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate perceived inequity, burnout, engagement and social support, under the supervision of our research team. The results demonstrate that perceived inequity affects the two main dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, beta=.371, p=.000; cynicism beta=.181, p=.011) but has no significant influence on employee engagement with their work. However buffer analysis shows that the interaction between perceived inequity and social support does have a partial effect on job burnout (emotional exhaustion beta=.151, deltaR2=.023, p=.021; personal accomplishment beta=-.215, deltaR2=.046, p=.002) and a considerable influence on job engagement (vigour beta=-.261, deltaR2=.068, p=.000; dedication beta=-.246, deltaR2=.06, p=.000; absorption beta=-.239, deltaR2=.057; p=.001). No evidence was found for the work sector buffer effect. Our findings add further insight to the field of perceived inequity in health-care contexts and could support leaders charged with managing human resources both in public and private sector.

Positive and negative effects of perceived inequity on italian healthcare workers: the role of social support

VIGNOLI, MICHELA;GUGLIELMI, DINA;SIMBULA, SILVIA;DEPOLO, MARCO
2012

Abstract

The aim of this research was to investigate the existing relationship and key related variables in the Italian health-care system. Although many studies have examined perceived inequity in work-place contexts, indicating job burnout as a main consequence, little research has focused on the moderator variable of this relationship. Here we also analyse whether or not perceived inequity could affect not only employee burnout but also positive outcomes such as engagement. We also set out to determine whether social support could moderate the relationship between perceived inequity and outcomes considered (burnout and engagement); and whether the work sector (public or private) and social support moderate the relationship between the perceived inequity and outcomes considered. 200 health care professionals, including social workers, medical practitioners and nurses, working in two different contexts, a public and a private hospital, were recruited for the study. All participants completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate perceived inequity, burnout, engagement and social support, under the supervision of our research team. The results demonstrate that perceived inequity affects the two main dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, beta=.371, p=.000; cynicism beta=.181, p=.011) but has no significant influence on employee engagement with their work. However buffer analysis shows that the interaction between perceived inequity and social support does have a partial effect on job burnout (emotional exhaustion beta=.151, deltaR2=.023, p=.021; personal accomplishment beta=-.215, deltaR2=.046, p=.002) and a considerable influence on job engagement (vigour beta=-.261, deltaR2=.068, p=.000; dedication beta=-.246, deltaR2=.06, p=.000; absorption beta=-.239, deltaR2=.057; p=.001). No evidence was found for the work sector buffer effect. Our findings add further insight to the field of perceived inequity in health-care contexts and could support leaders charged with managing human resources both in public and private sector.
2012
Vignoli M.; Guglielmi D.; Simbula S.; Depolo M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/134200
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