: Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) deficiency disorder (CDD) is a rare neurodevelopmental disease caused by mutations in the X-linked CDKL5 gene. CDD is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including early-onset refractory epileptic seizures, intellectual disability, hypotonia, visual disturbances, and autism-like features. The Cdkl5 knockout (KO) mouse recapitulates several features of CDD, including autistic-like behavior, impaired learning and memory, and motor stereotypies. These behavioral alterations are accompanied by diminished neuronal maturation and survival, reduced dendritic branching and spine maturation, and marked microglia activation. There is currently no cure or effective treatment to ameliorate the symptoms of the disease. Aerobic exercise is known to exert multiple beneficial effects in the brain, not only by increasing neurogenesis, but also by improving motor and cognitive tasks. To date, no studies have analyzed the effect of physical exercise on the phenotype of a CDD mouse model. In view of the positive effects of voluntary running on the brain of mouse models of various human neurodevelopmental disorders, we sought to determine whether voluntary daily running, sustained over a month, could improve brain development and behavioral defects in Cdkl5 KO mice. Our study showed that long-term voluntary running improved the hyperlocomotion and impulsivity behaviors and memory performance of Cdkl5 KO mice. This is correlated with increased hippocampal neurogenesis, neuronal survival, spine maturation, and inhibition of microglia activation. These behavioral and structural improvements were associated with increased BDNF levels. Given the positive effects of BDNF on brain development and function, the present findings support the positive benefits of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for CDD.

Mottolese, N., Uguagliati, B., Tassinari, M., Cerchier, C.B., Loi, M., Candini, G., et al. (2023). Voluntary Running Improves Behavioral and Structural Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder. BIOMOLECULES, 13(9), 1-19 [10.3390/biom13091396].

Voluntary Running Improves Behavioral and Structural Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder

Mottolese, Nicola
Investigation
;
Uguagliati, Beatrice
Data Curation
;
Tassinari, Marianna
Formal Analysis
;
Cerchier, Camilla Bruna
Software
;
Loi, Manuela
Conceptualization
;
Candini, Giulia
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Rimondini, Roberto
Methodology
;
Medici, Giorgio
Resources
;
Trazzi, Stefania
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Ciani, Elisabetta
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
2023

Abstract

: Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) deficiency disorder (CDD) is a rare neurodevelopmental disease caused by mutations in the X-linked CDKL5 gene. CDD is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including early-onset refractory epileptic seizures, intellectual disability, hypotonia, visual disturbances, and autism-like features. The Cdkl5 knockout (KO) mouse recapitulates several features of CDD, including autistic-like behavior, impaired learning and memory, and motor stereotypies. These behavioral alterations are accompanied by diminished neuronal maturation and survival, reduced dendritic branching and spine maturation, and marked microglia activation. There is currently no cure or effective treatment to ameliorate the symptoms of the disease. Aerobic exercise is known to exert multiple beneficial effects in the brain, not only by increasing neurogenesis, but also by improving motor and cognitive tasks. To date, no studies have analyzed the effect of physical exercise on the phenotype of a CDD mouse model. In view of the positive effects of voluntary running on the brain of mouse models of various human neurodevelopmental disorders, we sought to determine whether voluntary daily running, sustained over a month, could improve brain development and behavioral defects in Cdkl5 KO mice. Our study showed that long-term voluntary running improved the hyperlocomotion and impulsivity behaviors and memory performance of Cdkl5 KO mice. This is correlated with increased hippocampal neurogenesis, neuronal survival, spine maturation, and inhibition of microglia activation. These behavioral and structural improvements were associated with increased BDNF levels. Given the positive effects of BDNF on brain development and function, the present findings support the positive benefits of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for CDD.
2023
Mottolese, N., Uguagliati, B., Tassinari, M., Cerchier, C.B., Loi, M., Candini, G., et al. (2023). Voluntary Running Improves Behavioral and Structural Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder. BIOMOLECULES, 13(9), 1-19 [10.3390/biom13091396].
Mottolese, Nicola; Uguagliati, Beatrice; Tassinari, Marianna; Cerchier, Camilla Bruna; Loi, Manuela; Candini, Giulia; Rimondini, Roberto; Medici, Gior...espandi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/945354
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