The development of plant-based protein polymers to employ in biofilm production represents the promising intersection between material science and sustainability, and allows to obtain biodegradable materials that also possess excellent physicochemical properties. A possible candidate for protein biopolymer production is phaseolin, a storage protein highly abundant in P Vulgaris beans. We previously showed that transformed tobacco chloroplasts could be employed to express a mutated phaseolin carrying a signal peptide (directing it into the thylakoids) also enriched of a cysteine residue added to its C-terminal region. This modification allows for the formation of inter-chain disulfide bonds, as we previously demonstrated, and should promote polymerization. To verify the effect of the peptide modification and to quantify polymer formation, we employed hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation coupled to UV and multi-angle laser scattering detection (HF5-UV-MALS): HF5 allows for the selective size-based separation of phaseolin species, whereas MALS calculates molar mass and conformation state of each population. With the use of two different HF5 separation methods we first observed the native state of P.Vulgaris phaseolin, mainly assembled into trimers, and compared it to mutated phaseolin (P*) which instead resulted highly aggregated. Then we further characterized P* using a second separation method, discriminating between two and distinct high-molecular weight (HMW) species, one averaging 0.8 × 106 Da and the second reaching the tens of million Da. Insight on the conformation of these HMW species was offered from their conformation plots, which confirmed the positive impact of the Cys modification on polymerization.

Perspectives on protein biopolymers: miniaturized flow field-flow fractionation-assisted characterization of a single-cysteine mutated phaseolin expressed in transplastomic tobacco plants

Marassi V.;De Marchis F.;Roda B.;Reschiglian P.;Zattoni A.
2021

Abstract

The development of plant-based protein polymers to employ in biofilm production represents the promising intersection between material science and sustainability, and allows to obtain biodegradable materials that also possess excellent physicochemical properties. A possible candidate for protein biopolymer production is phaseolin, a storage protein highly abundant in P Vulgaris beans. We previously showed that transformed tobacco chloroplasts could be employed to express a mutated phaseolin carrying a signal peptide (directing it into the thylakoids) also enriched of a cysteine residue added to its C-terminal region. This modification allows for the formation of inter-chain disulfide bonds, as we previously demonstrated, and should promote polymerization. To verify the effect of the peptide modification and to quantify polymer formation, we employed hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation coupled to UV and multi-angle laser scattering detection (HF5-UV-MALS): HF5 allows for the selective size-based separation of phaseolin species, whereas MALS calculates molar mass and conformation state of each population. With the use of two different HF5 separation methods we first observed the native state of P.Vulgaris phaseolin, mainly assembled into trimers, and compared it to mutated phaseolin (P*) which instead resulted highly aggregated. Then we further characterized P* using a second separation method, discriminating between two and distinct high-molecular weight (HMW) species, one averaging 0.8 × 106 Da and the second reaching the tens of million Da. Insight on the conformation of these HMW species was offered from their conformation plots, which confirmed the positive impact of the Cys modification on polymerization.
Marassi V.; De Marchis F.; Roda B.; Bellucci M.; Capecchi A.; Reschiglian P.; Pompa A.; Zattoni A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/850273
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