Lifestyle changes are considered first line treatment in type 2 diabetes, but very few data are available in the “real world” of diabetes units. We aimed to measure the effectiveness of moderate and high intensity interventions on weight loss, metabolic control and insulin use We report a prospective cohort study, carried out in 822 consecutive subjects with type 2 diabetes, first seen in a 4-year period in a diabetes unit of an academy hospital. Subjects were either treated with a sole prescriptive diet (Diet), or received an additional short-course Elementary Nutritional Education (4 group sessions - ENE) or an intensive Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (12-15 group sessions - CBT). The results were adjusted for the propensity score to be assigned different treatments, derived from logistic regression on the basis of age, gender, BMI, HbA1C, diabetes duration and insulin use at baseline. Main outcome measures were weight loss and weight loss maintenance, metabolic control, secondary failure to insulin use. Both structured programs produced a larger weight loss, and the adjusted probability of achieving the 7% weight loss target was increased. Similarly, both programs favoured metabolic control, irrespective of insulin use. After adjustment for propensity score, both ENE (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27-0.84) and CBT (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.16-0.83) were associated with a reduced risk of de novo insulin treatment. We conclude that structured behavioural programs aimed at lifestyle changes are feasible and effective in the “real world” setting of a diabetes unit for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Are behavioral approaches feasible and effective in type 2 diabetes? A propensity score analysis

FORLANI, GABRIELE;MOSCATIELLO, SIMONA;MELCHIONDA, NAZARIO;DI DOMIZIO, SILVIA;MARCHESINI REGGIANI, GIULIO
2009

Abstract

Lifestyle changes are considered first line treatment in type 2 diabetes, but very few data are available in the “real world” of diabetes units. We aimed to measure the effectiveness of moderate and high intensity interventions on weight loss, metabolic control and insulin use We report a prospective cohort study, carried out in 822 consecutive subjects with type 2 diabetes, first seen in a 4-year period in a diabetes unit of an academy hospital. Subjects were either treated with a sole prescriptive diet (Diet), or received an additional short-course Elementary Nutritional Education (4 group sessions - ENE) or an intensive Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (12-15 group sessions - CBT). The results were adjusted for the propensity score to be assigned different treatments, derived from logistic regression on the basis of age, gender, BMI, HbA1C, diabetes duration and insulin use at baseline. Main outcome measures were weight loss and weight loss maintenance, metabolic control, secondary failure to insulin use. Both structured programs produced a larger weight loss, and the adjusted probability of achieving the 7% weight loss target was increased. Similarly, both programs favoured metabolic control, irrespective of insulin use. After adjustment for propensity score, both ENE (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27-0.84) and CBT (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.16-0.83) were associated with a reduced risk of de novo insulin treatment. We conclude that structured behavioural programs aimed at lifestyle changes are feasible and effective in the “real world” setting of a diabetes unit for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.
G Forlani; C Lorusso; S Moscatiello; V Ridolfi; N Melchionda; S Di Domizio; G Marchesini Reggiani
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/76503
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