The use of a dietary rosemary extract (DRE) containing carnosic acid and carnosol at 1:1 (w/w) for enhancing the lipid oxidative stability in the cooked-chilled lamb meat is evaluated. Three diets for fattening lambs are tested: i) a cereal-based concentrate as negative control (C-diet); ii) the C-diet plus 600 mg vitamin E per kg feed as positive control (E-diet); and iii) the C-diet plus 600 mg rosemary diterpenes per kg feed (R-diet). Lipid and cholesterol oxidative stability is assessed in cooked-chilled lamb patties kept at 4 °C and lighting for 2 days, simulating catering conditions. Both diterpenes and -tocopherol are highly resistant to the feed pelleting procedure. In contrast, diterpenes have a lower deposition rate than vitamin E in lamb muscle and are completely degraded during cooking. Consequently, the DRE is less effective than dietary vitamin E in enhancing the oxidative stability of lipids in the cooked-chilled lamb patties. After 2 days of storage, the R-diet shows lower (p < 0.01) peroxide values (PV) and lower levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances than the C-diet, while, in contrast to the E-diet, it does not inhibit (p > 0.05) the formation of cholesterol oxidation products. In addition, the R-diet increases (p < 0.05) the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids and decreases (p < 0.05) the n-6/n-3 FA ratio, improving the nutritional profile of lamb fat. These findings suggest antioxidant protection by dietary bioactive compounds beyond the direct radical scavenging activity that is able to stabilize lipids during the meat shelf life. Practical Applications: Cooked-chilled meat lipids strongly oxidize in ready-to-eat dishes kept in retailing conditions, which may negatively affect their levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), cholesterol oxidation products (COP), and other lipid oxidation products. Dietary rosemary diterpenes can be used as a clean alternative to feed additives to enhance the oxidative stability of cooked-chilled meat. Improved health and antioxidant status of the animal might be able to reduce oxidative spoilage during meat shelf-life. Diterpenes provide lesser antioxidant protection than dietary vitamin E but may improve the PUFA content, with positive implications for the nutritional quality of lamb fat. The use of dietary antioxidants with different properties may contribute to improving the efficacy of animal feeds to improve meat quality.

Enhancing lipid oxidative stability of cooked-chilled lamb meat through dietary rosemary diterpenes / J. Ortuño, R. Inchingolo, P. Delgado, V. Cardenia, M. T. Rodriguez-Estrada, M. J. Jordán, S. Bañon. - In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF LIPID SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. - ISSN 1438-7697. - ELETTRONICO. - 122:1900124(2020), pp. 1-11. [10.1002/ejlt.201900124]

Enhancing lipid oxidative stability of cooked-chilled lamb meat through dietary rosemary diterpenes

R. Inchingolo;M. T. Rodriguez-Estrada;
2020

Abstract

The use of a dietary rosemary extract (DRE) containing carnosic acid and carnosol at 1:1 (w/w) for enhancing the lipid oxidative stability in the cooked-chilled lamb meat is evaluated. Three diets for fattening lambs are tested: i) a cereal-based concentrate as negative control (C-diet); ii) the C-diet plus 600 mg vitamin E per kg feed as positive control (E-diet); and iii) the C-diet plus 600 mg rosemary diterpenes per kg feed (R-diet). Lipid and cholesterol oxidative stability is assessed in cooked-chilled lamb patties kept at 4 °C and lighting for 2 days, simulating catering conditions. Both diterpenes and -tocopherol are highly resistant to the feed pelleting procedure. In contrast, diterpenes have a lower deposition rate than vitamin E in lamb muscle and are completely degraded during cooking. Consequently, the DRE is less effective than dietary vitamin E in enhancing the oxidative stability of lipids in the cooked-chilled lamb patties. After 2 days of storage, the R-diet shows lower (p < 0.01) peroxide values (PV) and lower levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances than the C-diet, while, in contrast to the E-diet, it does not inhibit (p > 0.05) the formation of cholesterol oxidation products. In addition, the R-diet increases (p < 0.05) the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids and decreases (p < 0.05) the n-6/n-3 FA ratio, improving the nutritional profile of lamb fat. These findings suggest antioxidant protection by dietary bioactive compounds beyond the direct radical scavenging activity that is able to stabilize lipids during the meat shelf life. Practical Applications: Cooked-chilled meat lipids strongly oxidize in ready-to-eat dishes kept in retailing conditions, which may negatively affect their levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), cholesterol oxidation products (COP), and other lipid oxidation products. Dietary rosemary diterpenes can be used as a clean alternative to feed additives to enhance the oxidative stability of cooked-chilled meat. Improved health and antioxidant status of the animal might be able to reduce oxidative spoilage during meat shelf-life. Diterpenes provide lesser antioxidant protection than dietary vitamin E but may improve the PUFA content, with positive implications for the nutritional quality of lamb fat. The use of dietary antioxidants with different properties may contribute to improving the efficacy of animal feeds to improve meat quality.
2020
Enhancing lipid oxidative stability of cooked-chilled lamb meat through dietary rosemary diterpenes / J. Ortuño, R. Inchingolo, P. Delgado, V. Cardenia, M. T. Rodriguez-Estrada, M. J. Jordán, S. Bañon. - In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF LIPID SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. - ISSN 1438-7697. - ELETTRONICO. - 122:1900124(2020), pp. 1-11. [10.1002/ejlt.201900124]
J. Ortuño, R. Inchingolo, P. Delgado, V. Cardenia, M. T. Rodriguez-Estrada, M. J. Jordán, S. Bañon
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/746302
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 6
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact