Objective: In psychiatry, the presence of residual symptoms after treatment is linked to the definitions of remission and recovery. To identify the presence of residual eating disorder (ED) symptoms and associated non-ED clinical features in remitted and recovered EDs, the current systematic review with meta-analysis was performed. Method: A systematic review was conducted on residual ED symptoms and non-ED clinical features including comorbid psychopathology, neurophysiological functioning, cognitive functioning, and quality of life in ED patients considered remitted or recovered. To examine residual ED symptoms, meta-analyses were performed while considering age, study quality, remission, and recovery criteria strictness as moderators. Sensitivity, publication bias, and heterogeneity analyses were also conducted. Results: The 64 studies selected for the systematic review underscored the presence of residual ED symptoms in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), and impairments and deficits in the additional features examined. From the 64 studies, 31 were selected regarding residual ED symptoms in AN for meta-analysis. Large effect sizes indicated that remitted/recovered AN patients reported significantly lower body mass index (Hedges' g = −0.62[−0.77, −0.46]) and significantly greater symptomatology in terms of ED examination-questionnaire (Hedges'g = 0.86 [0.48,1.23]) and ED inventory (Hedges' g = 0.94[0.64,1.24]) than healthy controls, independently of remission and recovery criteria strictness, age, and study quality. Discussion: The presence of residual ED symptoms in AN is quantitatively supported, whereas the presence of residual ED symptoms in BN should be further investigated. Data on binge-eating disorder are missing. Future research should use consistent, multicomponent, and standardized comparable indicators of recovery.

Residual eating disorder symptoms and clinical features in remitted and recovered eating disorder patients: A systematic review with meta-analysis

Tomba E.;Tecuta L.;Crocetti E.;Squarcio F.;Tomei G.
2019

Abstract

Objective: In psychiatry, the presence of residual symptoms after treatment is linked to the definitions of remission and recovery. To identify the presence of residual eating disorder (ED) symptoms and associated non-ED clinical features in remitted and recovered EDs, the current systematic review with meta-analysis was performed. Method: A systematic review was conducted on residual ED symptoms and non-ED clinical features including comorbid psychopathology, neurophysiological functioning, cognitive functioning, and quality of life in ED patients considered remitted or recovered. To examine residual ED symptoms, meta-analyses were performed while considering age, study quality, remission, and recovery criteria strictness as moderators. Sensitivity, publication bias, and heterogeneity analyses were also conducted. Results: The 64 studies selected for the systematic review underscored the presence of residual ED symptoms in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), and impairments and deficits in the additional features examined. From the 64 studies, 31 were selected regarding residual ED symptoms in AN for meta-analysis. Large effect sizes indicated that remitted/recovered AN patients reported significantly lower body mass index (Hedges' g = −0.62[−0.77, −0.46]) and significantly greater symptomatology in terms of ED examination-questionnaire (Hedges'g = 0.86 [0.48,1.23]) and ED inventory (Hedges' g = 0.94[0.64,1.24]) than healthy controls, independently of remission and recovery criteria strictness, age, and study quality. Discussion: The presence of residual ED symptoms in AN is quantitatively supported, whereas the presence of residual ED symptoms in BN should be further investigated. Data on binge-eating disorder are missing. Future research should use consistent, multicomponent, and standardized comparable indicators of recovery.
2019
Tomba E.; Tecuta L.; Crocetti E.; Squarcio F.; Tomei G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/712270
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