Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents one of the major causes of mortality and disability in the world. TBI is characterized by primary damage resulting from the mechanical forces applied to the head as a direct result of the trauma and by the subsequent secondary injury due to a complex cascade of biochemical events that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the genesis of the delayed harmful effects contributing to permanent damage. NADPH oxidases (Nox), ubiquitary membrane multisubunit enzymes whose unique function is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), have been shown to be a major source of ROS in the brain and to be involved in several neurological diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Nox is upregulated after TBI, suggesting Nox critical role in the onset and development of this pathology. In this review, we summarize the current evidence about the role of Nox enzymes in the pathophysiology of TBI.

Angeloni C, Prata C, Dalla Sega FV, Piperno R, Hrelia S (2015). Traumatic brain injury and NADPH oxidase: A deep relationship. OXIDATIVE MEDICINE AND CELLULAR LONGEVITY, 2015, 1-10 [10.1155/2015/370312].

Traumatic brain injury and NADPH oxidase: A deep relationship

ANGELONI, CRISTINA;PRATA, CECILIA;VIECELI DALLA SEGA, FRANCESCO;HRELIA, SILVANA
2015

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents one of the major causes of mortality and disability in the world. TBI is characterized by primary damage resulting from the mechanical forces applied to the head as a direct result of the trauma and by the subsequent secondary injury due to a complex cascade of biochemical events that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the genesis of the delayed harmful effects contributing to permanent damage. NADPH oxidases (Nox), ubiquitary membrane multisubunit enzymes whose unique function is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), have been shown to be a major source of ROS in the brain and to be involved in several neurological diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Nox is upregulated after TBI, suggesting Nox critical role in the onset and development of this pathology. In this review, we summarize the current evidence about the role of Nox enzymes in the pathophysiology of TBI.
2015
Angeloni C, Prata C, Dalla Sega FV, Piperno R, Hrelia S (2015). Traumatic brain injury and NADPH oxidase: A deep relationship. OXIDATIVE MEDICINE AND CELLULAR LONGEVITY, 2015, 1-10 [10.1155/2015/370312].
Angeloni C; Prata C; Dalla Sega FV; Piperno R; Hrelia S
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/488569
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