distress, mood, and quality of life of well-educated individuals with type 1 diabetes. A newly developed support program was offered to 60 patients with type 1 diabetes on intensive insulin treatment, previously enrolled in group-care educational programs. Thirty-three subjects participated (experimental group, in groups of 8-12 subjects); 22, who postponed their entry, were used as controls. The program consisted of 7 weekly work sessions of 2 hours chaired by a psychologist and covered aspects of daily living with diabetes using role-playing, metaplan, and problem solving. At baseline and approximately 6 months later, all participants completed a battery of questionnaires, and the differences between the experimental and the control group were analyzed by repeated-measurements ANOVA. In response to the psychological support program, subjects in the experimental group reduced their depressive mood (Beck Depression Inventory and depression scales of the Psychological Well-Being Index) and anxiety (Self-rating Anxiety Scale), improved disease-specific quality of life (Symptom and Well-Being scales of the Well-Being Enquiry for Diabetes), increased their internal and decreased their external locus of control. These changes were accompanied by a 0.3% decrease in glycosylated hemoglobin, whereas no significant changes were observed in the control group (ANOVA, P = 0.032). These results underline the importance of psychological aspects in individuals with type 1 diabetes; treating the psychological aspects related to the disease may be as important as medical control in order to improve living with diabetes.

A psychological support program for individuals with type 1 diabetes

FORLANI, GABRIELE;NUCCITELLI, CHIARA;CASELLI, CHIARA;MOSCATIELLO, SIMONA;MAZZOTTI, ARIANNA;CENTIS, ELENA;MARCHESINI REGGIANI, GIULIO
2013

Abstract

distress, mood, and quality of life of well-educated individuals with type 1 diabetes. A newly developed support program was offered to 60 patients with type 1 diabetes on intensive insulin treatment, previously enrolled in group-care educational programs. Thirty-three subjects participated (experimental group, in groups of 8-12 subjects); 22, who postponed their entry, were used as controls. The program consisted of 7 weekly work sessions of 2 hours chaired by a psychologist and covered aspects of daily living with diabetes using role-playing, metaplan, and problem solving. At baseline and approximately 6 months later, all participants completed a battery of questionnaires, and the differences between the experimental and the control group were analyzed by repeated-measurements ANOVA. In response to the psychological support program, subjects in the experimental group reduced their depressive mood (Beck Depression Inventory and depression scales of the Psychological Well-Being Index) and anxiety (Self-rating Anxiety Scale), improved disease-specific quality of life (Symptom and Well-Being scales of the Well-Being Enquiry for Diabetes), increased their internal and decreased their external locus of control. These changes were accompanied by a 0.3% decrease in glycosylated hemoglobin, whereas no significant changes were observed in the control group (ANOVA, P = 0.032). These results underline the importance of psychological aspects in individuals with type 1 diabetes; treating the psychological aspects related to the disease may be as important as medical control in order to improve living with diabetes.
ACTA DIABETOLOGICA
G Forlani; C Nuccitelli; C Caselli; S Moscatiello; A Mazzotti; E Centis; G Marchesini Reggiani
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/258092
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