This study aims to shed light on the dual impact of appraisals of pandemic-induced job stressors on employee knowledge sharing and hiding behaviors. Drawing on the transactional attribution model, we hypothesize that employee perceptions of supervisor compassionate and self-serving behavior would positively mediate the impact of employee challenge and hindrance appraisals of pandemic-induced job stressors on employee knowledge sharing and knowledge hiding, respectively. Moreover, stressor appraisals are expected to interact with employee attributions of supervisor compassionate and self-serving motives in shaping perceptions of supervisor compassionate and self-serving behavior, respectively. To test our hypotheses, we conducted two independent studies—a three-wave full longitudinal study with 230 employees from UK and U.S. firms during the first COVID-19 outbreak and a randomized scenario-based experiment with 210 U.S. employees. Cross-lagged structural equation analyses, analyses of variance, and path analyses fully supported our predictions, thus providing a nuanced understanding of the role of perceived supervisor behavior and attributions of supervisor motives in accounting for the differential effects of employee appraisals of pandemic-induced job stressors on knowledge behaviors.

Sharing and hiding knowledge under pandemics: The role of stressor appraisals, perceived supervisor behaviors and attributions of supervisor motives / Montani, Francesco; Sommovigo, Valentina; Staglianò, Raffaele. - In: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT JOURNAL. - ISSN 0954-5395. - ELETTRONICO. - online first:(2024), pp. 1-30. [10.1111/1748-8583.12548]

Sharing and hiding knowledge under pandemics: The role of stressor appraisals, perceived supervisor behaviors and attributions of supervisor motives

Montani, Francesco;Sommovigo, Valentina;
2024

Abstract

This study aims to shed light on the dual impact of appraisals of pandemic-induced job stressors on employee knowledge sharing and hiding behaviors. Drawing on the transactional attribution model, we hypothesize that employee perceptions of supervisor compassionate and self-serving behavior would positively mediate the impact of employee challenge and hindrance appraisals of pandemic-induced job stressors on employee knowledge sharing and knowledge hiding, respectively. Moreover, stressor appraisals are expected to interact with employee attributions of supervisor compassionate and self-serving motives in shaping perceptions of supervisor compassionate and self-serving behavior, respectively. To test our hypotheses, we conducted two independent studies—a three-wave full longitudinal study with 230 employees from UK and U.S. firms during the first COVID-19 outbreak and a randomized scenario-based experiment with 210 U.S. employees. Cross-lagged structural equation analyses, analyses of variance, and path analyses fully supported our predictions, thus providing a nuanced understanding of the role of perceived supervisor behavior and attributions of supervisor motives in accounting for the differential effects of employee appraisals of pandemic-induced job stressors on knowledge behaviors.
2024
Sharing and hiding knowledge under pandemics: The role of stressor appraisals, perceived supervisor behaviors and attributions of supervisor motives / Montani, Francesco; Sommovigo, Valentina; Staglianò, Raffaele. - In: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT JOURNAL. - ISSN 0954-5395. - ELETTRONICO. - online first:(2024), pp. 1-30. [10.1111/1748-8583.12548]
Montani, Francesco; Sommovigo, Valentina; Staglianò, Raffaele
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
R4 - Anonymized Main Document - MS Word.pdf

embargo fino al 14/03/2026

Tipo: Postprint
Licenza: Licenza per accesso libero gratuito
Dimensione 698.32 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
698.32 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Contatta l'autore

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/969512
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact