In this work, we analysed new LOw Frequency ARray observations of the mini halo in the cluster RBS797, together with archival Very Large Array observations and the recent Chandra results. This cluster is known to host a powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN) at its centre, with two pairs of jets propagating in orthogonal directions. Recent X-ray observations have detected three pairs of shock fronts, connected with the activity of the central AGN. Our aim is to investigate the connection between the mini halo emission and the activity of the central source. We find that the diffuse radio emission is elongated in different directions at 144 MHz (east-west) with respect to 1.4 GHz (north-south), tracing the orientation of the two pairs of jets. The mini halo emission is characterised by an average spectral index $\alpha=-1.02\pm 0.05$. The spectral index profile of the mini halo shows a gradual flattening from the centre to the periphery. Such a trend is unique among the mini halos studied to date, and resembles the spectral index trend typical of particles re-accelerated by shocks. However, the estimated contribution to the radio brightness profile coming from shock re-acceleration is found to be insufficient to account for the radial brightness profile of the mini halo. We propose three scenarios that could explain the observed trend: (i) the AGN-driven shocks are propagating onto an already existing mini halo, re-energising the electrons. We estimate that the polarisation induced by the shocks could be detected at 6 GHz and above; (ii) we could be witnessing turbulent re-acceleration in a high magnetic field cluster; and (iii) the mini halo could have a hadronic origin, in which the particles are injected by Future observations in polarisation would be fundamental to understand the role of shocks and the magnetic field.

Shock imprints on the radio mini halo in RBS797 / A. Bonafede; M. Gitti; N. La Bella; N. Biava; F. Ubertosi; G. Brunetti; G. Lusetti; M. Brienza; C. J. Riseley; C. Stuardi; A. Botteon; A. Ignesti; H. Röttgering; R. J. van Weeren. - In: ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS. - ISSN 1432-0746. - ELETTRONICO. - 680:(2023), pp. 1-12.

Shock imprints on the radio mini halo in RBS797

A. Bonafede;M. Gitti;N. Biava;F. Ubertosi;G. Lusetti;C. Stuardi;A. Botteon;A. Ignesti;
2023

Abstract

In this work, we analysed new LOw Frequency ARray observations of the mini halo in the cluster RBS797, together with archival Very Large Array observations and the recent Chandra results. This cluster is known to host a powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN) at its centre, with two pairs of jets propagating in orthogonal directions. Recent X-ray observations have detected three pairs of shock fronts, connected with the activity of the central AGN. Our aim is to investigate the connection between the mini halo emission and the activity of the central source. We find that the diffuse radio emission is elongated in different directions at 144 MHz (east-west) with respect to 1.4 GHz (north-south), tracing the orientation of the two pairs of jets. The mini halo emission is characterised by an average spectral index $\alpha=-1.02\pm 0.05$. The spectral index profile of the mini halo shows a gradual flattening from the centre to the periphery. Such a trend is unique among the mini halos studied to date, and resembles the spectral index trend typical of particles re-accelerated by shocks. However, the estimated contribution to the radio brightness profile coming from shock re-acceleration is found to be insufficient to account for the radial brightness profile of the mini halo. We propose three scenarios that could explain the observed trend: (i) the AGN-driven shocks are propagating onto an already existing mini halo, re-energising the electrons. We estimate that the polarisation induced by the shocks could be detected at 6 GHz and above; (ii) we could be witnessing turbulent re-acceleration in a high magnetic field cluster; and (iii) the mini halo could have a hadronic origin, in which the particles are injected by Future observations in polarisation would be fundamental to understand the role of shocks and the magnetic field.
2023
Shock imprints on the radio mini halo in RBS797 / A. Bonafede; M. Gitti; N. La Bella; N. Biava; F. Ubertosi; G. Brunetti; G. Lusetti; M. Brienza; C. J. Riseley; C. Stuardi; A. Botteon; A. Ignesti; H. Röttgering; R. J. van Weeren. - In: ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS. - ISSN 1432-0746. - ELETTRONICO. - 680:(2023), pp. 1-12.
A. Bonafede; M. Gitti; N. La Bella; N. Biava; F. Ubertosi; G. Brunetti; G. Lusetti; M. Brienza; C. J. Riseley; C. Stuardi; A. Botteon; A. Ignesti; H. Röttgering; R. J. van Weeren
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/956907
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