In adolescence individuals enlarge their social relationships and peer groups acquire a strong importance for their identity. Moreover, adolescents can experiment negative relationships with peers, i.e., bullying/cyberbullying. The present study aims to investigate the relationship between the feeling of belonging to a specific group, social identification, the distance that adolescents maintain interacting with others, interpersonal distance, and bullying/cyberbullying behaviors. Adolescents (age range 10–15 years) completed online measures of group identification (social identification with classmates, friends and family), interpersonal distance, and bullying and cyberbullying (perpetration and victimization). Results showed that adolescents with low social identification with classmates and friends chose larger interpersonal distance. Additionally, low scores in social identification with classmates were associated with higher victimization in cyberbullying. In contrast, adolescents with low scores in social identification with family were more involved as bullies in bullying and as victims in cyberbullying. Male adolescents were more likely to be victimized in bullying than females. This study underlines how social identification with peers and family works as a buffer in interfacing strangers, adjusting the distance maintained with them, and as a protective factor against aggressive relationships in adolescence. This study provides new opportunities for psychologists in understanding the psychological dynamics that shape social interactions among adolescents.

Belonging matters: The impact of social identification with classmates, friends, and family on interpersonal distance and bullying/cyberbullying in adolescence / JuanJuan Wei, Michela Candini, Laura Menabo, Annalisa Guarini, Monica Rubini, Francesca Frassinetti. - In: PLOS ONE. - ISSN 1932-6203. - ELETTRONICO. - 19:2(2024), pp. e0297370.1-e0297370.16. [10.1371/journal.pone.0297370]

Belonging matters: The impact of social identification with classmates, friends, and family on interpersonal distance and bullying/cyberbullying in adolescence

JuanJuan Wei
Co-primo
;
Michela Candini
Co-primo
;
Laura Menabo;Annalisa Guarini;Monica Rubini
Penultimo
;
Francesca Frassinetti
Ultimo
2024

Abstract

In adolescence individuals enlarge their social relationships and peer groups acquire a strong importance for their identity. Moreover, adolescents can experiment negative relationships with peers, i.e., bullying/cyberbullying. The present study aims to investigate the relationship between the feeling of belonging to a specific group, social identification, the distance that adolescents maintain interacting with others, interpersonal distance, and bullying/cyberbullying behaviors. Adolescents (age range 10–15 years) completed online measures of group identification (social identification with classmates, friends and family), interpersonal distance, and bullying and cyberbullying (perpetration and victimization). Results showed that adolescents with low social identification with classmates and friends chose larger interpersonal distance. Additionally, low scores in social identification with classmates were associated with higher victimization in cyberbullying. In contrast, adolescents with low scores in social identification with family were more involved as bullies in bullying and as victims in cyberbullying. Male adolescents were more likely to be victimized in bullying than females. This study underlines how social identification with peers and family works as a buffer in interfacing strangers, adjusting the distance maintained with them, and as a protective factor against aggressive relationships in adolescence. This study provides new opportunities for psychologists in understanding the psychological dynamics that shape social interactions among adolescents.
2024
Belonging matters: The impact of social identification with classmates, friends, and family on interpersonal distance and bullying/cyberbullying in adolescence / JuanJuan Wei, Michela Candini, Laura Menabo, Annalisa Guarini, Monica Rubini, Francesca Frassinetti. - In: PLOS ONE. - ISSN 1932-6203. - ELETTRONICO. - 19:2(2024), pp. e0297370.1-e0297370.16. [10.1371/journal.pone.0297370]
JuanJuan Wei, Michela Candini, Laura Menabo, Annalisa Guarini, Monica Rubini, Francesca Frassinetti
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/956454
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