According to the Geroscience concept that organismal aging and age-associated diseases share the same basic molecular mechanisms, the identification of biomarkers of age that can efficiently classify people as biologically older (or younger) than their chronological (i.e. calendar) age is becoming of paramount importance. These people will be in fact at higher (or lower) risk for many different age-associated diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, cancer, etc. In turn, patients suffering from these diseases are biologically older than healthy age-matched individuals. Many biomarkers that correlate with age have been described so far. The aim of the present review is to discuss the usefulness of some of these biomarkers (especially soluble, circulating ones) in order to identify frail patients, possibly before the appearance of clinical symptoms, as well as patients at risk for age-associated diseases. An overview of selected biomarkers will be discussed in this regard, in particular we will focus on biomarkers related to metabolic stress response, inflammation, and cell death (in particular in neurodegeneration), all phenomena connected to inflammaging (chronic, low-grade, age-associated inflammation). In the second part of the review, next-generation markers such as extracellular vesicles and their cargos, epigenetic markers and gut microbiota composition, will be discussed. Since recent progresses in omics techniques have allowed an exponential increase in the production of laboratory data also in the field of biomarkers of age, making it difficult to extract biological meaning from the huge mass of available data, Artificial Intelligence (AI) approaches will be discussed as an increasingly important strategy for extracting knowledge from raw data and providing practitioners with actionable information to treat patients.

Biomarkers of aging in frailty and age-associated disorders: State of the art and future perspective / Salvioli S.; Basile M.S.; Bencivenga L.; Carrino S.; Conte M.; Damanti S.; De Lorenzo R.; Fiorenzato E.; Gialluisi A.; Ingannato A.; Antonini A.; Baldini N.; Capri M.; Cenci S.; Iacoviello L.; Nacmias B.; Olivieri F.; Rengo G.; Querini P.R.; Lattanzio F.. - In: AGEING RESEARCH REVIEWS. - ISSN 1568-1637. - STAMPA. - 91:(2023), pp. 102044.1-102044.23. [10.1016/j.arr.2023.102044]

Biomarkers of aging in frailty and age-associated disorders: State of the art and future perspective

Salvioli S.
;
Carrino S.;Conte M.;Baldini N.;Capri M.;
2023

Abstract

According to the Geroscience concept that organismal aging and age-associated diseases share the same basic molecular mechanisms, the identification of biomarkers of age that can efficiently classify people as biologically older (or younger) than their chronological (i.e. calendar) age is becoming of paramount importance. These people will be in fact at higher (or lower) risk for many different age-associated diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, cancer, etc. In turn, patients suffering from these diseases are biologically older than healthy age-matched individuals. Many biomarkers that correlate with age have been described so far. The aim of the present review is to discuss the usefulness of some of these biomarkers (especially soluble, circulating ones) in order to identify frail patients, possibly before the appearance of clinical symptoms, as well as patients at risk for age-associated diseases. An overview of selected biomarkers will be discussed in this regard, in particular we will focus on biomarkers related to metabolic stress response, inflammation, and cell death (in particular in neurodegeneration), all phenomena connected to inflammaging (chronic, low-grade, age-associated inflammation). In the second part of the review, next-generation markers such as extracellular vesicles and their cargos, epigenetic markers and gut microbiota composition, will be discussed. Since recent progresses in omics techniques have allowed an exponential increase in the production of laboratory data also in the field of biomarkers of age, making it difficult to extract biological meaning from the huge mass of available data, Artificial Intelligence (AI) approaches will be discussed as an increasingly important strategy for extracting knowledge from raw data and providing practitioners with actionable information to treat patients.
2023
Biomarkers of aging in frailty and age-associated disorders: State of the art and future perspective / Salvioli S.; Basile M.S.; Bencivenga L.; Carrino S.; Conte M.; Damanti S.; De Lorenzo R.; Fiorenzato E.; Gialluisi A.; Ingannato A.; Antonini A.; Baldini N.; Capri M.; Cenci S.; Iacoviello L.; Nacmias B.; Olivieri F.; Rengo G.; Querini P.R.; Lattanzio F.. - In: AGEING RESEARCH REVIEWS. - ISSN 1568-1637. - STAMPA. - 91:(2023), pp. 102044.1-102044.23. [10.1016/j.arr.2023.102044]
Salvioli S.; Basile M.S.; Bencivenga L.; Carrino S.; Conte M.; Damanti S.; De Lorenzo R.; Fiorenzato E.; Gialluisi A.; Ingannato A.; Antonini A.; Baldini N.; Capri M.; Cenci S.; Iacoviello L.; Nacmias B.; Olivieri F.; Rengo G.; Querini P.R.; Lattanzio F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/952688
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