The identification and localization of organic components in the complex stratigraphy of paintings play a crucial role in studies of painting techniques and authentication, restoration, and conservation of artworks. Much scientific effort has been expended for the development of analytical approaches suitable for the investigation and characterization of organic substances, allowing high sensitivity, specificity, and spatial resolution. Proteins (e.g., ovalbumin, casein, and collagen from different animal sources) are one of the classes of organic substances most widely used as painting materials. The analytical techniques commonly used for their analysis (micro Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, chromatographic techniques, and proteomic approaches) have limits related to the lack of specificity or to the absence of information concerning the stratigraphic localization of the detected proteins. Immunological techniques are a promising alternative approach for the characterization of proteins in artworks. Thanks to the high specificity of antigen-antibody reactions, these techniques are widely used for the analysis of proteins in bioanalytical and clinical chemistry and recently they have been successfully applied in the field of science for conservation of cultural heritage. The present research aimed to develop an ultrasensitive chemiluminescent immunochemical procedure for the simultaneous localization of ovalbumin and bovine casein (two common proteins found in binding media or varnishes of artistic and archaeological samples) in resin-embedded painting micro cross-sections. The possibility of performing the simultaneous identification of different proteins in painting cross-sections is of particular relevance in the field of cultural heritage because samples are often small and available in a limited number; therefore, the maximum amount of information must be obtained from each of them.

Development of a multiplexed chemiluminescent immunochemical imaging technique for the simultaneous localization of different proteins in painting micro cross-sections

SCIUTTO, GIORGIA;DOLCI, LUISA STELLA;BURAGINA, ANGELA;PRATI, SILVIA;GUARDIGLI, MASSIMO;MAZZEO, ROCCO;RODA, ALDO
2011

Abstract

The identification and localization of organic components in the complex stratigraphy of paintings play a crucial role in studies of painting techniques and authentication, restoration, and conservation of artworks. Much scientific effort has been expended for the development of analytical approaches suitable for the investigation and characterization of organic substances, allowing high sensitivity, specificity, and spatial resolution. Proteins (e.g., ovalbumin, casein, and collagen from different animal sources) are one of the classes of organic substances most widely used as painting materials. The analytical techniques commonly used for their analysis (micro Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, chromatographic techniques, and proteomic approaches) have limits related to the lack of specificity or to the absence of information concerning the stratigraphic localization of the detected proteins. Immunological techniques are a promising alternative approach for the characterization of proteins in artworks. Thanks to the high specificity of antigen-antibody reactions, these techniques are widely used for the analysis of proteins in bioanalytical and clinical chemistry and recently they have been successfully applied in the field of science for conservation of cultural heritage. The present research aimed to develop an ultrasensitive chemiluminescent immunochemical procedure for the simultaneous localization of ovalbumin and bovine casein (two common proteins found in binding media or varnishes of artistic and archaeological samples) in resin-embedded painting micro cross-sections. The possibility of performing the simultaneous identification of different proteins in painting cross-sections is of particular relevance in the field of cultural heritage because samples are often small and available in a limited number; therefore, the maximum amount of information must be obtained from each of them.
Sciutto G.; Dolci L.S.; Buragina A.; Prati S.; Guardigli M.; Mazzeo R.; Roda A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/93132
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