Representation learning models for graphs are a successful family of techniques that project nodes into feature spaces that can be exploited by other machine learning algorithms. Since many real-world networks are inherently dynamic, with interactions among nodes changing over time, these techniques can be defined both for static and for time-varying graphs. Here, we show how the skip-gram embedding approach can be generalized to perform implicit tensor factorization on different tensor representations of time-varying graphs. We show that higher-order skip-gram with negative sampling (HOSGNS) is able to disentangle the role of nodes and time, with a small fraction of the number of parameters needed by other approaches. We empirically evaluate our approach using time-resolved face-to-face proximity data, showing that the learned representations outperform state-of-the-art methods when used to solve downstream tasks such as network reconstruction. Good performance on predicting the outcome of dynamical processes such as disease spreading shows the potential of this method to estimate contagion risk, providing early risk awareness based on contact tracing data. Supplementary information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1140/epjds/s13688-022-00344-8.

Time-varying graph representation learning via higher-order skip-gram with negative sampling

Piaggesi S.;
2022

Abstract

Representation learning models for graphs are a successful family of techniques that project nodes into feature spaces that can be exploited by other machine learning algorithms. Since many real-world networks are inherently dynamic, with interactions among nodes changing over time, these techniques can be defined both for static and for time-varying graphs. Here, we show how the skip-gram embedding approach can be generalized to perform implicit tensor factorization on different tensor representations of time-varying graphs. We show that higher-order skip-gram with negative sampling (HOSGNS) is able to disentangle the role of nodes and time, with a small fraction of the number of parameters needed by other approaches. We empirically evaluate our approach using time-resolved face-to-face proximity data, showing that the learned representations outperform state-of-the-art methods when used to solve downstream tasks such as network reconstruction. Good performance on predicting the outcome of dynamical processes such as disease spreading shows the potential of this method to estimate contagion risk, providing early risk awareness based on contact tracing data. Supplementary information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1140/epjds/s13688-022-00344-8.
2022
Piaggesi S.; Panisson A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/914205
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