The inhabitants of the world are expected to grow by two billion in the next two decades; as population increases, food demand rises too, leading to more intensive resource exploitation and greater negative externalities related to food production. In this paper the environmental impact of meals provided in school canteens are analysed through the Life Cycle Assessment methodology, in order to evaluate the GHGs emissions released by food production. Meals, and not just individual foods, have been considered so as to include in the analysis the nutritional aspects on which meals are based. Results shows that meat, fish and dairy products are the most impacting in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, with values that shift from 31.7 and 24.1 kg CO2 eq for butter and veal, to 2.37 kg CO2 eq for the octopus, while vegetables, legumes, fruit and cereals are less carbon intensive (average of 3.71 kg CO2 eq for the considered vegetables). When the environmental impact is related to the food energy, the best option are first courses because they combine a low carbon footprint with a high energy content. The results of the work can be used both by the consumer, who can base the meal choice on environmental impact information, and by food services, who can adjust menus to achieve a more sustainable production.

Environmental Impact of Meals: How Big Is the Carbon Footprint in the School Canteens? / Volanti M.; Arfelli F.; Neri E.; Saliani A.; Passarini F.; Vassura I.; Cristallo G.. - In: FOODS. - ISSN 2304-8158. - ELETTRONICO. - 11:2(2022), pp. 193.1-193.10. [10.3390/foods11020193]

Environmental Impact of Meals: How Big Is the Carbon Footprint in the School Canteens?

Volanti M.
Primo
;
Arfelli F.
Secondo
;
Neri E.;Saliani A.;Passarini F.
;
Vassura I.
Penultimo
;
2022

Abstract

The inhabitants of the world are expected to grow by two billion in the next two decades; as population increases, food demand rises too, leading to more intensive resource exploitation and greater negative externalities related to food production. In this paper the environmental impact of meals provided in school canteens are analysed through the Life Cycle Assessment methodology, in order to evaluate the GHGs emissions released by food production. Meals, and not just individual foods, have been considered so as to include in the analysis the nutritional aspects on which meals are based. Results shows that meat, fish and dairy products are the most impacting in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, with values that shift from 31.7 and 24.1 kg CO2 eq for butter and veal, to 2.37 kg CO2 eq for the octopus, while vegetables, legumes, fruit and cereals are less carbon intensive (average of 3.71 kg CO2 eq for the considered vegetables). When the environmental impact is related to the food energy, the best option are first courses because they combine a low carbon footprint with a high energy content. The results of the work can be used both by the consumer, who can base the meal choice on environmental impact information, and by food services, who can adjust menus to achieve a more sustainable production.
2022
Environmental Impact of Meals: How Big Is the Carbon Footprint in the School Canteens? / Volanti M.; Arfelli F.; Neri E.; Saliani A.; Passarini F.; Vassura I.; Cristallo G.. - In: FOODS. - ISSN 2304-8158. - ELETTRONICO. - 11:2(2022), pp. 193.1-193.10. [10.3390/foods11020193]
Volanti M.; Arfelli F.; Neri E.; Saliani A.; Passarini F.; Vassura I.; Cristallo G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/899101
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