Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) has become a global threat to public health systems around the world in recent decades. In 2017, Italy was placed among the worst-performing nations in Europe by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, due to worryingly high levels of AMR in Italian hospitals and regions. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the state of the art of research on AMR in Italy over the last five years. The PubMed database was searched to identify studies presenting original data. Forty-three of the 9721 records identified were included. Overall, AMR rates ranged from 3% (in a group of sheep farmers) to 78% (in a hospital setting). The methods used to identify the microorganisms, to test their susceptibility and the criteria adopted for the breakpoint were deficient in 7, 7 and 11 studies, respectively. The main findings of our review were that most studies (79.1%) considered hospitalised patients only, 4 studies (9.3%) analysed non-hospitalised populations only. In addition, only 7 studies were multicentric and no scientific literature on the subject was produced in 7 Italian regions. In order to have a solid basis on the topic for the interventions of public health professionals and other stakeholders, studies analysing the phenomenon should be conducted in a methodologically standardised manner, should include all areas of the country and should also focus on out-of-hospital and community-based care and work settings.

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) in Italy over the Past Five Years: A Systematic Review

Marco Montalti;Giorgia Soldà;Giorgia Gribaudo;Giusy La Fauci;Aurelia Salussolia;Francesca Scognamiglio;Davide Gori
2022

Abstract

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) has become a global threat to public health systems around the world in recent decades. In 2017, Italy was placed among the worst-performing nations in Europe by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, due to worryingly high levels of AMR in Italian hospitals and regions. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the state of the art of research on AMR in Italy over the last five years. The PubMed database was searched to identify studies presenting original data. Forty-three of the 9721 records identified were included. Overall, AMR rates ranged from 3% (in a group of sheep farmers) to 78% (in a hospital setting). The methods used to identify the microorganisms, to test their susceptibility and the criteria adopted for the breakpoint were deficient in 7, 7 and 11 studies, respectively. The main findings of our review were that most studies (79.1%) considered hospitalised patients only, 4 studies (9.3%) analysed non-hospitalised populations only. In addition, only 7 studies were multicentric and no scientific literature on the subject was produced in 7 Italian regions. In order to have a solid basis on the topic for the interventions of public health professionals and other stakeholders, studies analysing the phenomenon should be conducted in a methodologically standardised manner, should include all areas of the country and should also focus on out-of-hospital and community-based care and work settings.
Marco Montalti, Giorgia Soldà, Angelo Capodici, Zeno Di Valerio, Giorgia Gribaudo, Giusy La Fauci, Aurelia Salussolia, Francesca Scognamiglio, Anna Zannoner, Davide Gori
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/888741
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