Substance use disorder is associated with accelerated disease progression in people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; PWH). Problem opioid use, including high-dose opioid therapy, prescription drug misuse, and opioid abuse, is high and increasing in the PWH population. Oxycodone is a broadly prescribed opioid in both the general population and PWH. Here, we allowed HIV transgenic (Tg) rats and wildtype (WT) littermates to intravenously self-administer oxycodone under short-access (ShA) conditions, which led to moderate, stable, “recreational”-like levels of drug intake, or under long-access (LgA) conditions, which led to escalated (dependent) drug intake. HIV Tg rats with histories of oxycodone self-administration under LgA conditions exhibited significant impairment in memory performance in the novel object recognition (NOR) paradigm. RNA-sequencing expression profiling of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in HIV Tg rats that self-administered oxycodone under ShA conditions exhibited greater transcriptional evidence of inflammation than WT rats that self-administered oxycodone under the same conditions. HIV Tg rats that self-administered oxycodone under LgA conditions exhibited transcriptional evidence of an increase in neuronal injury and neurodegeneration compared with WT rats under the same conditions. Gene expression analysis indicated that glucocorticoid-dependent adaptations contributed to the gene expression effects of oxycodone self-administration. Overall, the present results indicate that a history of opioid intake promotes neuroinflammation and glucocorticoid dysregulation, and excessive opioid intake is associated with neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment in HIV Tg rats.

Escalated (Dependent) Oxycodone Self-Administration Is Associated with Cognitive Impairment and Transcriptional Evidence of Neurodegeneration in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Transgenic Rats

Mercatelli D.;Giorgi F. M.;
2022

Abstract

Substance use disorder is associated with accelerated disease progression in people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; PWH). Problem opioid use, including high-dose opioid therapy, prescription drug misuse, and opioid abuse, is high and increasing in the PWH population. Oxycodone is a broadly prescribed opioid in both the general population and PWH. Here, we allowed HIV transgenic (Tg) rats and wildtype (WT) littermates to intravenously self-administer oxycodone under short-access (ShA) conditions, which led to moderate, stable, “recreational”-like levels of drug intake, or under long-access (LgA) conditions, which led to escalated (dependent) drug intake. HIV Tg rats with histories of oxycodone self-administration under LgA conditions exhibited significant impairment in memory performance in the novel object recognition (NOR) paradigm. RNA-sequencing expression profiling of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in HIV Tg rats that self-administered oxycodone under ShA conditions exhibited greater transcriptional evidence of inflammation than WT rats that self-administered oxycodone under the same conditions. HIV Tg rats that self-administered oxycodone under LgA conditions exhibited transcriptional evidence of an increase in neuronal injury and neurodegeneration compared with WT rats under the same conditions. Gene expression analysis indicated that glucocorticoid-dependent adaptations contributed to the gene expression effects of oxycodone self-administration. Overall, the present results indicate that a history of opioid intake promotes neuroinflammation and glucocorticoid dysregulation, and excessive opioid intake is associated with neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment in HIV Tg rats.
2022
Fu Y.; Lorrai I.; Zorman B.; Mercatelli D.; Shankula C.; Gaytan J.M.; Lefebvre C.; de Guglielmo G.; Kim H.R.; Sumazin P.; Giorgi F.M.; Repunte-Canonigo V.; Sanna P.P.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/884255
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