Given the high concentration of indoor airborne particles during the winter and their harmful effects on human health, it is of great importance to examine combined effects of the ventilation and heat source on indoor particle dispersion. The present study aims to investigate transient dispersion and deposition of indoor particles under the heat recovery ventilation (HRV). Five groups of particles with different diameters ranging from 0.1 to 10 μm were taken into account, representing the inhalable indoor airborne particles. By considering three different heating systems, including the radiator, floor heating system and fan coil, the integrated ventilation-heating effects on particle dispersion were evaluated and compared. An Eulerian-Lagrangian CFD model was developed to predict turbulent characteristics of the airflow field and unsteady particle trajectories. The role of particle size, air change rate and outdoor temperature was addressed. In addition, influence of the heat source position on the particle decay rate and removal efficiency was investigated. The results indicated that the impact of heating system on the particle decay rate is weakened by increasing the ventilation rate. Among all heating systems, the radiator renders the highest dispersion rate and the slowest decay rate, even lower than a single HRV unit. It was revealed that, for an intermediate ventilation rate, the particle deposition rate in fan coil system is 3.6 and 2.4 times faster than the radiator and floor heating systems, respectively. It was also found that displacing the radiator to the opposite side of the ventilation unit quadruplicates the removal efficiency and leads to 146% enhancement of the decay rate coefficient.

Integrated effects of the heat recovery ventilation and heat source on decay rate of indoor airborne particles: A comparative study

Jahanbin A.
Primo
;
Semprini G.
Secondo
2022

Abstract

Given the high concentration of indoor airborne particles during the winter and their harmful effects on human health, it is of great importance to examine combined effects of the ventilation and heat source on indoor particle dispersion. The present study aims to investigate transient dispersion and deposition of indoor particles under the heat recovery ventilation (HRV). Five groups of particles with different diameters ranging from 0.1 to 10 μm were taken into account, representing the inhalable indoor airborne particles. By considering three different heating systems, including the radiator, floor heating system and fan coil, the integrated ventilation-heating effects on particle dispersion were evaluated and compared. An Eulerian-Lagrangian CFD model was developed to predict turbulent characteristics of the airflow field and unsteady particle trajectories. The role of particle size, air change rate and outdoor temperature was addressed. In addition, influence of the heat source position on the particle decay rate and removal efficiency was investigated. The results indicated that the impact of heating system on the particle decay rate is weakened by increasing the ventilation rate. Among all heating systems, the radiator renders the highest dispersion rate and the slowest decay rate, even lower than a single HRV unit. It was revealed that, for an intermediate ventilation rate, the particle deposition rate in fan coil system is 3.6 and 2.4 times faster than the radiator and floor heating systems, respectively. It was also found that displacing the radiator to the opposite side of the ventilation unit quadruplicates the removal efficiency and leads to 146% enhancement of the decay rate coefficient.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/873998
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