No consensus exists on how to model human articulations within MSK models for the analysis of gait dynamics. We propose a method to evaluate joint models and we apply it to three models with different levels of personalization. The method evaluates the joint model’s adherence to the MSK hypothesis of negligible joint work by quantifying ligament and cartilage deformations resulting from joint motion; to be anatomically consistent, these deformations should be minimum. The contrary would require considerable external work to move the joint, violating a strong working hypothesis and raising concerns about the credibility of the MSK outputs. Gait analysis and medical resonance imaging (MRI) from ten participants were combined to build lower limb subject-specific MSK models. MRI-reconstructed anatomy enabled three levels of personalization using different ankle joint models, in which motion corresponded to different ligament elongation and cartilage co-penetration. To estimate the impact of anatomical inconsistency in MSK outputs, joint internal forces resulting from tissue deformations were computed for each joint model and MSK simulations were performed ignoring or considering their contribution. The three models differed considerably for maximum ligament elongation and cartilage co-penetration (between 5.94 and 50.69% and between −0.53 and −5.36 mm, respectively). However, the model dynamic output from the gait simulations were similar. When accounting for the internal forces associated with tissue deformation, outputs changed considerably, the higher the personalization level the smaller the changes. Anatomical consistency provides a solid method to compare different joint models. Results suggest that consistency grows with personalization, which should be tailored according to the research question. A high level of anatomical consistency is recommended when individual specificity and the behavior of articular structures is under investigation.

Modeling musculoskeletal dynamics during gait: Evaluating the best personalization strategy through model anatomical consistency

Conconi M.;Sancisi N.;
2021

Abstract

No consensus exists on how to model human articulations within MSK models for the analysis of gait dynamics. We propose a method to evaluate joint models and we apply it to three models with different levels of personalization. The method evaluates the joint model’s adherence to the MSK hypothesis of negligible joint work by quantifying ligament and cartilage deformations resulting from joint motion; to be anatomically consistent, these deformations should be minimum. The contrary would require considerable external work to move the joint, violating a strong working hypothesis and raising concerns about the credibility of the MSK outputs. Gait analysis and medical resonance imaging (MRI) from ten participants were combined to build lower limb subject-specific MSK models. MRI-reconstructed anatomy enabled three levels of personalization using different ankle joint models, in which motion corresponded to different ligament elongation and cartilage co-penetration. To estimate the impact of anatomical inconsistency in MSK outputs, joint internal forces resulting from tissue deformations were computed for each joint model and MSK simulations were performed ignoring or considering their contribution. The three models differed considerably for maximum ligament elongation and cartilage co-penetration (between 5.94 and 50.69% and between −0.53 and −5.36 mm, respectively). However, the model dynamic output from the gait simulations were similar. When accounting for the internal forces associated with tissue deformation, outputs changed considerably, the higher the personalization level the smaller the changes. Anatomical consistency provides a solid method to compare different joint models. Results suggest that consistency grows with personalization, which should be tailored according to the research question. A high level of anatomical consistency is recommended when individual specificity and the behavior of articular structures is under investigation.
Conconi M.; Montefiori E.; Sancisi N.; Mazza C.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/870207
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