In prosthetics and orthotics design, it is sometimes necessary to approximate the multiaxial motion of several human joints to a simple rotation about a single fixed axis. A new technique for the calculation of this axis is proposed, originally based on Burmester’s theory. This was compared with traditional approaches based on the mean and finite helical axes. The three techniques were assessed by relevant optimal axis estimation in in vitro measurements of tibiotalar joint motion. A standard jig and radiostereometry were used in two anatomical specimens to obtain accurate measurements of joint flexion. The performance of each technique was determined by comparing the motion based on the resulting axis with the experimental data. Random noise with magnitude typically similar to that of the skin motion was also added to the measured motion. All three techniques performed well in identifying a single rotation axis for tibiotalar joint motion. Burmester’s theory provides an additional method for human joint motion analysis, which is particularly robust when experimental data are considerably error affected.

Helical axis calculation based on Burmester theory: experimental comparison with traditional techniques for human tibiotalar joint motion

SANCISI, NICOLA;PARENTI CASTELLI, VINCENZO;CORAZZA, FEDERICO;LEARDINI, ALBERTO
2009

Abstract

In prosthetics and orthotics design, it is sometimes necessary to approximate the multiaxial motion of several human joints to a simple rotation about a single fixed axis. A new technique for the calculation of this axis is proposed, originally based on Burmester’s theory. This was compared with traditional approaches based on the mean and finite helical axes. The three techniques were assessed by relevant optimal axis estimation in in vitro measurements of tibiotalar joint motion. A standard jig and radiostereometry were used in two anatomical specimens to obtain accurate measurements of joint flexion. The performance of each technique was determined by comparing the motion based on the resulting axis with the experimental data. Random noise with magnitude typically similar to that of the skin motion was also added to the measured motion. All three techniques performed well in identifying a single rotation axis for tibiotalar joint motion. Burmester’s theory provides an additional method for human joint motion analysis, which is particularly robust when experimental data are considerably error affected.
SANCISI N.; PARENTI CASTELLI V.; CORAZZA F.; LEARDINI A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/86797
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