Background: Preterm birth has been recognized as a risk factor for perinatal depression (PND), with consequences for parenting and child development; however, the impact of severity of prematurity on parental PND course has not been studied extensively. Exploring the PND trajectory across postpartum period, investigating whether it changed according to birth weight and parental role, can help developing effective interventions. Methods: At 3 (T1), 9 (T2) and 12 (T3) months postpartum, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was administered to 177 parental couples, differentiated in 38 parents of extremely low birth weight (ELBW), 56 of very low birth weight (VLBW) and 83 of full-term (FT) infants. Trajectories were modeled by Growth Curve Models. Results: As a function of time, results revealed a general decrease in PND across the year. Considering birth weight, ELBW parents showed higher PND levels at T1 and a higher reduction of symptoms over time than VLBW and FT ones. Given also parental role, ELBW mothers showed higher PND levels at T1 and a higher decrease of symptoms over time than VLBW and FT mothers and fathers. Limitations: Limitations included modest sample size, self-report measures, and unmeasured potential confounders. Conclusion: Findings suggest that premature birth in relation to its severity may lead to different affective reactions in mothers and fathers; particularly mothers, in case of more serious preterm condition, are at higher risk for PND in the first trimester, however showing improvement over time. Interventions should be promoted, and tailored, according to the risk connected to severity of prematurity.

Severity of preterm birth and perinatal depressive symptoms in mothers and fathers: Trajectories over the first postpartum year

Genova F.
;
Neri E.;Trombini E.;Stella M.;Agostini F.
2022

Abstract

Background: Preterm birth has been recognized as a risk factor for perinatal depression (PND), with consequences for parenting and child development; however, the impact of severity of prematurity on parental PND course has not been studied extensively. Exploring the PND trajectory across postpartum period, investigating whether it changed according to birth weight and parental role, can help developing effective interventions. Methods: At 3 (T1), 9 (T2) and 12 (T3) months postpartum, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was administered to 177 parental couples, differentiated in 38 parents of extremely low birth weight (ELBW), 56 of very low birth weight (VLBW) and 83 of full-term (FT) infants. Trajectories were modeled by Growth Curve Models. Results: As a function of time, results revealed a general decrease in PND across the year. Considering birth weight, ELBW parents showed higher PND levels at T1 and a higher reduction of symptoms over time than VLBW and FT ones. Given also parental role, ELBW mothers showed higher PND levels at T1 and a higher decrease of symptoms over time than VLBW and FT mothers and fathers. Limitations: Limitations included modest sample size, self-report measures, and unmeasured potential confounders. Conclusion: Findings suggest that premature birth in relation to its severity may lead to different affective reactions in mothers and fathers; particularly mothers, in case of more serious preterm condition, are at higher risk for PND in the first trimester, however showing improvement over time. Interventions should be promoted, and tailored, according to the risk connected to severity of prematurity.
Genova F.; Neri E.; Trombini E.; Stella M.; Agostini F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/842802
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