An integrated model, based on a One Health approach, was implemented to estimate the epidemiological and economic outcomes of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in Veneto region, an hypo-endemic area of Northern Italy, and the costs for its prevention. Data and information needed to populate the model were retrieved from published literature, official statistics, expert opinions, or actively searched through data mining (i.e., Hospital and slaughterhouse data), when fundamental data were not available. Human-health and animal-health costs, both public and private, were considered. The overall impact of CE in the study area was estimated in an yearly cost of about 0.5 million €, due to an average of 19.5 human hospitalized cases and about 200 infected animals among cattle and sheep, per year. The human:animal costs ratio was about 8:1. Most of the infected animals were autochthonous, while the identification of an autochthonous source of the infection for the human cases was extremely difficult, and unlikely in most cases. No specific action resulted to be in place for human surveillance, while veterinary surveillance accounted for a yearly cost of about 22,000 €. Sheepherders were found to pay privately an overall amount of around 2000 € for the preventive treatment of their dogs every year, but the applied protocol proved to be sub-optimal. The source of most of the human cases was likely external to the study area, and their economic impact accounts for a cost that is far exceeding that of surveillance and preventive actions in place in the veterinary sector. Although autochthonous human cases appeared to be very rare, the strengthening of preventive actions and surveillance systems can reduce the risk of their increment.

A One-Health evaluation of the burden of cystic echinococcosis and its prevention costs: Case study from a hypo-endemic area in Italy

Massimo Canali;Maurizio Aragrande
2021

Abstract

An integrated model, based on a One Health approach, was implemented to estimate the epidemiological and economic outcomes of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in Veneto region, an hypo-endemic area of Northern Italy, and the costs for its prevention. Data and information needed to populate the model were retrieved from published literature, official statistics, expert opinions, or actively searched through data mining (i.e., Hospital and slaughterhouse data), when fundamental data were not available. Human-health and animal-health costs, both public and private, were considered. The overall impact of CE in the study area was estimated in an yearly cost of about 0.5 million €, due to an average of 19.5 human hospitalized cases and about 200 infected animals among cattle and sheep, per year. The human:animal costs ratio was about 8:1. Most of the infected animals were autochthonous, while the identification of an autochthonous source of the infection for the human cases was extremely difficult, and unlikely in most cases. No specific action resulted to be in place for human surveillance, while veterinary surveillance accounted for a yearly cost of about 22,000 €. Sheepherders were found to pay privately an overall amount of around 2000 € for the preventive treatment of their dogs every year, but the applied protocol proved to be sub-optimal. The source of most of the human cases was likely external to the study area, and their economic impact accounts for a cost that is far exceeding that of surveillance and preventive actions in place in the veterinary sector. Although autochthonous human cases appeared to be very rare, the strengthening of preventive actions and surveillance systems can reduce the risk of their increment.
2021
Rudi Cassini, Massimo Canali, Francesca Tamarozzi, Andrea Angheben, Gioia Capelli, Federico Gobbi, Matteo Legnardi, Michele Brichese, Giuseppina Napoletano, Fabrizio Cestaro, Adriano Casulli, Michele Drigo, Maurizio Aragrande
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/831684
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