Landslides are common landscape features in the Northern Apennine mountain chain and cause frequent damages to human structures and infrastructure. Most landslides in the area can be classified as earthflows, where the clay-shales form the substrate, whereas complex landslides with flow and sliding components are common on the slopes where fine-grained turbidites form the substrate. Most of these landslides move periodically with contained velocities and, only after particular rainfall events, some of them accelerate abruptly. Space-borne synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) provides a particularly convenient way for studying the periods before and after failures. In this paper, we present InSAR-results derived from the Sentinel 1 satellite constellation for two landslide cases in the Northern Apennines. The first case is a complex landslide that is hosted on a pelitic flysch formation, whereas the second case is an earthflow located in chaotic clay shales. Both cases failed catastrophically and threatened or damaged important infrastructures. In the case of the complex landslide, we report spatially variations of the deformation field between repeated periods of acceleration. The data illustrate that the deformation initiated in the upper part of the slope and expanded over the whole landslide body afterward. In the case of the earthflow, we describe spatial and temporal kinematics during the period before a catastrophic failure in March 2018. We discuss the temporal deformation signal together with rainfall and snowmelt data from a nearby meteorological station. Deformation and precipitation data highlight that high total precipitation can be considered the trigger of the failure.

Pre- and post-failure dynamics of landslides in the Northern Apennines revealed by space-borne synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR)

Squarzoni G.;Simoni A.
2020

Abstract

Landslides are common landscape features in the Northern Apennine mountain chain and cause frequent damages to human structures and infrastructure. Most landslides in the area can be classified as earthflows, where the clay-shales form the substrate, whereas complex landslides with flow and sliding components are common on the slopes where fine-grained turbidites form the substrate. Most of these landslides move periodically with contained velocities and, only after particular rainfall events, some of them accelerate abruptly. Space-borne synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) provides a particularly convenient way for studying the periods before and after failures. In this paper, we present InSAR-results derived from the Sentinel 1 satellite constellation for two landslide cases in the Northern Apennines. The first case is a complex landslide that is hosted on a pelitic flysch formation, whereas the second case is an earthflow located in chaotic clay shales. Both cases failed catastrophically and threatened or damaged important infrastructures. In the case of the complex landslide, we report spatially variations of the deformation field between repeated periods of acceleration. The data illustrate that the deformation initiated in the upper part of the slope and expanded over the whole landslide body afterward. In the case of the earthflow, we describe spatial and temporal kinematics during the period before a catastrophic failure in March 2018. We discuss the temporal deformation signal together with rainfall and snowmelt data from a nearby meteorological station. Deformation and precipitation data highlight that high total precipitation can be considered the trigger of the failure.
Squarzoni G.; Bayer B.; Franceschini S.; Simoni A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/787218
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