Medical devices measure vital parameters such as pulse, respiration rate, and blood oxygenation, over periods of days or weeks in a continuous manner. Traditional systems only support such requirements in stationary applications where a constant power supply is available. Trends toward remote healthcare and telemedicine require wearable devices, able to provide similar functionalities in wireless mode. Miniaturized and thin form factors, desirable in wearable applications, set stringent constraints on the available power, and consequently on the accuracy and lifetime. Energy harvesting combined with low-power design and energy efficient processing can significantly extend the lifetime of wearable devices. This paper presents a wearable pulse oximeter assembled in a 3D ring-like geometry that achieves self-sustainability by exploiting efficient power management, solar energy harvesting, and ultra-low power processing in a multi-core microcontroller. The design strategy of combining onboard processing to monitor blood oxygenation and the transmission of only relevant information via a Bluetooth low-energy (BLE) interface, significantly reduces the overall energy consumption. Experimental results on the designed and developed prototype demonstrate that measuring the blood oxygenation once every minute with a sampling rate of 100 samples/s achieve accurate results at the daily energy consumption of 28 J including hourly BLE transmissions. The low-power design allows the system to be self-sustainable with just 64 min of sunlight per day or 12 hrs. of indoor home light.

Self-Sustainable Smart Ring for Long-Term Monitoring of Blood Oxygenation

Benini, Luca
2019

Abstract

Medical devices measure vital parameters such as pulse, respiration rate, and blood oxygenation, over periods of days or weeks in a continuous manner. Traditional systems only support such requirements in stationary applications where a constant power supply is available. Trends toward remote healthcare and telemedicine require wearable devices, able to provide similar functionalities in wireless mode. Miniaturized and thin form factors, desirable in wearable applications, set stringent constraints on the available power, and consequently on the accuracy and lifetime. Energy harvesting combined with low-power design and energy efficient processing can significantly extend the lifetime of wearable devices. This paper presents a wearable pulse oximeter assembled in a 3D ring-like geometry that achieves self-sustainability by exploiting efficient power management, solar energy harvesting, and ultra-low power processing in a multi-core microcontroller. The design strategy of combining onboard processing to monitor blood oxygenation and the transmission of only relevant information via a Bluetooth low-energy (BLE) interface, significantly reduces the overall energy consumption. Experimental results on the designed and developed prototype demonstrate that measuring the blood oxygenation once every minute with a sampling rate of 100 samples/s achieve accurate results at the daily energy consumption of 28 J including hourly BLE transmissions. The low-power design allows the system to be self-sustainable with just 64 min of sunlight per day or 12 hrs. of indoor home light.
Magno, Michele; Salvatore, Giovanni A.; Jokic, Petar; Benini, Luca
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/724607
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