Background Postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade (RNMB) is a common complication in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), but also one of the most controversial issues. Many studies and trials demonstrated that some methods and techniques can reduce the incidence and the extent of the phenomenon. Study Objective To determine the incidence of RNMB in the PACU at standardized times after extubation with the implementation of a protocol of careful neuromuscular blockade management. Design Randomized, single-blinded controlled clinical trial. Setting Operating room and PACU. Patients A total of 120 patients of either sex with American Society of Anesthesiologists grades 1, 2, and 3, aged 18 to 80 years were scheduled to undergo elective abdominal surgical procedures lasting for at least 60 minutes. Interventions Patients were randomized to receive either cisatracurium (n = 60) or rocuronium (n = 60) at the time of intubation and during surgery. Every patient received quantitative neuromuscular monitoring during general anesthesia. On completion of surgery, patients were given neostigmine 0.05 mg kg−1. Patients were extubated at a train-of-four (TOF) ratio ≥0.9. Measurements TOF measurements were performed 15, 30, and 60 minutes after extubation. Tolerability of neuromuscular monitoring was evaluated with a scale from 1 to 10 (with 1 meaning no discomfort at all and 10 meaning maximal discomfort or pain). Results Six, 11, and 14 patients (5.0%, 9.2%, and 11.7%) exhibited a TOF ratio <0.9 at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after extubation, respectively. No statistically significant difference in the postoperative RNMB between cisatracurium and rocuronium was found. The median tolerability score for neuromuscular monitoring was 3. Conclusion Careful conduction, monitoring, and subsequent reversal of neuromuscular block may allow for obtaining considerably low incidence of residual neuromuscular block. However, our trial shows that some mid- and long-term cases of TOF ratios <0.9 can still occur, possibly jeopardizing the patients' postoperative recovery.

Cisatracurium- and rocuronium-associated residual neuromuscular dysfunction under intraoperative neuromuscular monitoring and postoperative neostigmine reversal: a single-blind randomized trial

Tonetti T.;
2016

Abstract

Background Postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade (RNMB) is a common complication in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), but also one of the most controversial issues. Many studies and trials demonstrated that some methods and techniques can reduce the incidence and the extent of the phenomenon. Study Objective To determine the incidence of RNMB in the PACU at standardized times after extubation with the implementation of a protocol of careful neuromuscular blockade management. Design Randomized, single-blinded controlled clinical trial. Setting Operating room and PACU. Patients A total of 120 patients of either sex with American Society of Anesthesiologists grades 1, 2, and 3, aged 18 to 80 years were scheduled to undergo elective abdominal surgical procedures lasting for at least 60 minutes. Interventions Patients were randomized to receive either cisatracurium (n = 60) or rocuronium (n = 60) at the time of intubation and during surgery. Every patient received quantitative neuromuscular monitoring during general anesthesia. On completion of surgery, patients were given neostigmine 0.05 mg kg−1. Patients were extubated at a train-of-four (TOF) ratio ≥0.9. Measurements TOF measurements were performed 15, 30, and 60 minutes after extubation. Tolerability of neuromuscular monitoring was evaluated with a scale from 1 to 10 (with 1 meaning no discomfort at all and 10 meaning maximal discomfort or pain). Results Six, 11, and 14 patients (5.0%, 9.2%, and 11.7%) exhibited a TOF ratio <0.9 at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after extubation, respectively. No statistically significant difference in the postoperative RNMB between cisatracurium and rocuronium was found. The median tolerability score for neuromuscular monitoring was 3. Conclusion Careful conduction, monitoring, and subsequent reversal of neuromuscular block may allow for obtaining considerably low incidence of residual neuromuscular block. However, our trial shows that some mid- and long-term cases of TOF ratios <0.9 can still occur, possibly jeopardizing the patients' postoperative recovery.
2016
Feltracco P.; Tonetti T.; Barbieri S.; Frigo A.C.; Ori C.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/722802
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