Objective: Malignant aortic tumors (MATs) are exceedingly rare, and a comprehensive review of clinical and therapeutic aspects is lacking in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyze all known cases of MATs and to identify predictors of patients' survival. Methods: All patients diagnosed with an aortic tumor treated in a single center along with all case reports and reviews available in the literature through a specific PubMed search using keywords such as “malignant” and “aorta” or “aortic,” “tumor,” or “sarcoma” or “angiosarcoma” were analyzed. The tumor's primary location, clinical presentation, histologic subtype, and treatment choice were examined. Survival at 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years and the possible preoperative and operative outcome predictors were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis with a log-rank test and by Cox regression for multivariate analysis. Results: In addition to the 5 cases treated in our center, 218 other cases of MAT were reported in the literature from 1873 to 2017. The mean age of the patients was 60.1 ± 11.9 years, and the male to female ratio was 1.59:1. The median overall survival from diagnosis was 8 (7-9) months; 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 26%, 7.6%, and 3.5%, respectively. Chronic hypertension (P = .03), fever (P = .03), back pain (P = .01), asthenia (P = .04), and signs of peripheral embolization (P = .007) were significant predictors of a poor result. Histologic subtypes had a different impact on survival, with no statistical significance. Compared with other treatment strategies, combined surgical-medical therapy had the best impact on the median survival rate (surgical-medical, 12 [8-24] months; medical, 8 [5-10] months; surgical 7 [2-16] months; no treatment, 2 [0.5-15] months; P = .001). Analyzing exclusively medical approaches, chemotherapy and radiotherapy had the best impact on median survival rate compared with untreated patients (chemotherapy-radiotherapy, 18 [10-26] months; radiotherapy, 16 [8-20] months; chemotherapy, 10 [7-24] months; no medical treatment, 6 [2-16] months; P = .005); these data were not sustained by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Aortic tumors are a malignant pathologic condition with a short survival rate after initial diagnosis. Survival is further diminished in the presence of clinical factors such as hypertension, fever, back pain, asthenia, and signs of peripheral embolization. Combined surgical and medical treatment, particularly with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, has shown the highest survival rate.

Predictors of survival in malignant aortic tumors

Vacirca A.;Faggioli G.
;
Pini R.;Indelicato G.;Fenelli C.;Bacchi Reggiani M. L.;Vasuri F.;Pasquinelli G.;Stella A.;Gargiulo M.
2020

Abstract

Objective: Malignant aortic tumors (MATs) are exceedingly rare, and a comprehensive review of clinical and therapeutic aspects is lacking in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyze all known cases of MATs and to identify predictors of patients' survival. Methods: All patients diagnosed with an aortic tumor treated in a single center along with all case reports and reviews available in the literature through a specific PubMed search using keywords such as “malignant” and “aorta” or “aortic,” “tumor,” or “sarcoma” or “angiosarcoma” were analyzed. The tumor's primary location, clinical presentation, histologic subtype, and treatment choice were examined. Survival at 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years and the possible preoperative and operative outcome predictors were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis with a log-rank test and by Cox regression for multivariate analysis. Results: In addition to the 5 cases treated in our center, 218 other cases of MAT were reported in the literature from 1873 to 2017. The mean age of the patients was 60.1 ± 11.9 years, and the male to female ratio was 1.59:1. The median overall survival from diagnosis was 8 (7-9) months; 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 26%, 7.6%, and 3.5%, respectively. Chronic hypertension (P = .03), fever (P = .03), back pain (P = .01), asthenia (P = .04), and signs of peripheral embolization (P = .007) were significant predictors of a poor result. Histologic subtypes had a different impact on survival, with no statistical significance. Compared with other treatment strategies, combined surgical-medical therapy had the best impact on the median survival rate (surgical-medical, 12 [8-24] months; medical, 8 [5-10] months; surgical 7 [2-16] months; no treatment, 2 [0.5-15] months; P = .001). Analyzing exclusively medical approaches, chemotherapy and radiotherapy had the best impact on median survival rate compared with untreated patients (chemotherapy-radiotherapy, 18 [10-26] months; radiotherapy, 16 [8-20] months; chemotherapy, 10 [7-24] months; no medical treatment, 6 [2-16] months; P = .005); these data were not sustained by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Aortic tumors are a malignant pathologic condition with a short survival rate after initial diagnosis. Survival is further diminished in the presence of clinical factors such as hypertension, fever, back pain, asthenia, and signs of peripheral embolization. Combined surgical and medical treatment, particularly with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, has shown the highest survival rate.
Vacirca A.; Faggioli G.; Pini R.; Freyrie A.; Indelicato G.; Fenelli C.; Bacchi Reggiani M.L.; Vasuri F.; Pasquinelli G.; Stella A.; Gargiulo M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/718545
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