Doctor fish (Garra rufa, Heckel, 1843) are increasingly used for cosmetic treatment raising particular concerns regarding the potential transmission of infections to clients. Investigations of microbial causes undertaken in two outbreaks of mortality among G. rufa used for cosmetic treatment revealed the presence of multiple bacteria, including both fish and human pathogens such as Aeromonas veronii, A. hydrophila, Vibrio cholerae, Shewanella putrefaciens, Mycobacterium marinum and M. goodii. This range of bacteria indicates an intense microbial proliferation involving multiple pathogens, most likely induced by the poor health condition of the fish. Most of the detected pathogens are well-known agents of zoonosis. Indeed, M. goodii is an emerging nosocomial human pathogen that has never been detected in fish to date, nor in other animals. This first detection of M. goodii associated with fish infection points out a new zoonotic potential for this pathogen. These findings point out that handling, poor environmental conditions and the presence of fish pathogens, that can compromise the immune system of fish, can result in a mixed microbial proliferation and increase the spread of waterborne bacteria, including zoonosis agents. Accordingly, the microbiological surveillance of fish used for cosmetic treatment is extremely important, particularly in association with mortality outbreaks.

Evidence of fish and human pathogens associated with doctor fish (Garra rufa, Heckel, 1843) used for cosmetic treatment

Volpe E.;Mandrioli L.;Errani F.;Serratore P.;Zavatta E.;Rigillo A.;Ciulli S.
2019

Abstract

Doctor fish (Garra rufa, Heckel, 1843) are increasingly used for cosmetic treatment raising particular concerns regarding the potential transmission of infections to clients. Investigations of microbial causes undertaken in two outbreaks of mortality among G. rufa used for cosmetic treatment revealed the presence of multiple bacteria, including both fish and human pathogens such as Aeromonas veronii, A. hydrophila, Vibrio cholerae, Shewanella putrefaciens, Mycobacterium marinum and M. goodii. This range of bacteria indicates an intense microbial proliferation involving multiple pathogens, most likely induced by the poor health condition of the fish. Most of the detected pathogens are well-known agents of zoonosis. Indeed, M. goodii is an emerging nosocomial human pathogen that has never been detected in fish to date, nor in other animals. This first detection of M. goodii associated with fish infection points out a new zoonotic potential for this pathogen. These findings point out that handling, poor environmental conditions and the presence of fish pathogens, that can compromise the immune system of fish, can result in a mixed microbial proliferation and increase the spread of waterborne bacteria, including zoonosis agents. Accordingly, the microbiological surveillance of fish used for cosmetic treatment is extremely important, particularly in association with mortality outbreaks.
JOURNAL OF FISH DISEASES
Volpe E.; Mandrioli L.; Errani F.; Serratore P.; Zavatta E.; Rigillo A.; Ciulli S.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/710690
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