Background: Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection is responsible of a high burden of neurosensory impairment in children. Objectives: To report incidence and consequences of ophthalmological abnormalities in infants with cCMV infection and better define their long-term ophthalmological management. Study design: Infants with cCMV infection were enrolled in a 6-year follow-up. Infants were classified as symptomatic or asymptomatic based on complete clinical, laboratory and instrumental evaluations. All infants underwent funduscopic evaluation in neonatal period, and yearly complete ophthalmological evaluation, including funduscopic, motility and visual acuity assessments. Results: Forty-eight infants were enrolled, 18/48 (37.5%) symptomatic and 30/48 (62.5%) asymptomatic. Mean duration of follow-up was 34.9 ± 22.2 vs. 34.8 ± 20.1 months (P = 0.98). Funduscopic abnormalities were identified in neonatal period in 7/18 (39%) symptomatic infants and in none of the infants without other clinical and instrumental abnormalities at birth (P < 0.001); chorioretinal scars were the most common finding (5/18 cases, 28%). Strabismus was detected in 1/18 (5.5%) symptomatic infants during the first years of life. Visual impairment at last follow-up evaluation was suspected or detected in 4/18 (22%) symptomatic infants and in none of the asymptomatic infants at birth (P = 0.01). Ophthalmological abnormalities were associated with other signs of central nervous system (CNS) involvement (P < 0.001). No correlation was found with the type of maternal infection. Conclusions: Ophthalmological abnormalities were common in symptomatic infants though often not associated with long-term visual impairment, and correlated with the presence of CNS involvement. Neonatal and periodical ophthalmological evaluations throughout childhood seem prudential for symptomatic babies. No ophthalmological abnormalities were detected in asymptomatic infants, who might therefore undergo more deferred evaluations.

Neonatal and long-term ophthalmological findings in infants with symptomatic and asymptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

Maria Grazia Capretti
;
Concetta Marsico;Simonetta Guidelli Guidi;CIARDELLA, ANTONIO;Giuliana Simonazzi;Silvia Galletti;Tiziana Lazzarotto;Giacomo Faldella
2017

Abstract

Background: Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection is responsible of a high burden of neurosensory impairment in children. Objectives: To report incidence and consequences of ophthalmological abnormalities in infants with cCMV infection and better define their long-term ophthalmological management. Study design: Infants with cCMV infection were enrolled in a 6-year follow-up. Infants were classified as symptomatic or asymptomatic based on complete clinical, laboratory and instrumental evaluations. All infants underwent funduscopic evaluation in neonatal period, and yearly complete ophthalmological evaluation, including funduscopic, motility and visual acuity assessments. Results: Forty-eight infants were enrolled, 18/48 (37.5%) symptomatic and 30/48 (62.5%) asymptomatic. Mean duration of follow-up was 34.9 ± 22.2 vs. 34.8 ± 20.1 months (P = 0.98). Funduscopic abnormalities were identified in neonatal period in 7/18 (39%) symptomatic infants and in none of the infants without other clinical and instrumental abnormalities at birth (P < 0.001); chorioretinal scars were the most common finding (5/18 cases, 28%). Strabismus was detected in 1/18 (5.5%) symptomatic infants during the first years of life. Visual impairment at last follow-up evaluation was suspected or detected in 4/18 (22%) symptomatic infants and in none of the asymptomatic infants at birth (P = 0.01). Ophthalmological abnormalities were associated with other signs of central nervous system (CNS) involvement (P < 0.001). No correlation was found with the type of maternal infection. Conclusions: Ophthalmological abnormalities were common in symptomatic infants though often not associated with long-term visual impairment, and correlated with the presence of CNS involvement. Neonatal and periodical ophthalmological evaluations throughout childhood seem prudential for symptomatic babies. No ophthalmological abnormalities were detected in asymptomatic infants, who might therefore undergo more deferred evaluations.
2017
Maria Grazia Capretti, Concetta Marsico, Simonetta Guidelli Guidi, Antonio Ciardella, Giuliana Simonazzi, Silvia Galletti, Liliana Gabrielli, Tiziana Lazzarotto, Giacomo Faldella
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/622062
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