Organic farming assumes an increasingly remarkable role within the Green Economy. The success on the market, guaranteed by an unique and clear certification that allows to embrace the needs of a critic and ethically oriented consumer’s needs, contributes to alter the agrarian practices in order to create a greater sustainable farming. Yet, at the same time, the necessity to lead organic to a mainstream level entails essential changes concerning production and distributive areas, which often are considered a mere commercialization of the values related to organic farming. The reaction to this state of affairs causes a radicalization of the organic movement that deals with the search for a direct fiduciary relationship between producer and consumer which frequently goes beyond the mere certification. That is a way back to a local size which tends to support the short food supply chain along with a certain quality sense in line with the increasing trend to personalization of consumption. What may appears as the productive and distributive fractioned system reemergence seems however intended to grow simultaneously with the certified organic sector, mainly thanks to new communication and services infrastructures linked to the Internet and the social dimension of web 2.0, which allow to increasingly reconcile the need of customized consumption and the search for direct fiduciary relationships with the current existing conditions imposed by complex globalized societies.

The Organic Movement in the Green Economy: From Certification to web

PALTRINIERI, ROBERTA;SPILLARE, STEFANO
2014

Abstract

Organic farming assumes an increasingly remarkable role within the Green Economy. The success on the market, guaranteed by an unique and clear certification that allows to embrace the needs of a critic and ethically oriented consumer’s needs, contributes to alter the agrarian practices in order to create a greater sustainable farming. Yet, at the same time, the necessity to lead organic to a mainstream level entails essential changes concerning production and distributive areas, which often are considered a mere commercialization of the values related to organic farming. The reaction to this state of affairs causes a radicalization of the organic movement that deals with the search for a direct fiduciary relationship between producer and consumer which frequently goes beyond the mere certification. That is a way back to a local size which tends to support the short food supply chain along with a certain quality sense in line with the increasing trend to personalization of consumption. What may appears as the productive and distributive fractioned system reemergence seems however intended to grow simultaneously with the certified organic sector, mainly thanks to new communication and services infrastructures linked to the Internet and the social dimension of web 2.0, which allow to increasingly reconcile the need of customized consumption and the search for direct fiduciary relationships with the current existing conditions imposed by complex globalized societies.
Paltrinieri, Roberta; Spillare, Stefano
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/536317
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