The rapid development of protein-based pharmaceuticals highlights the need for robust analytical methods to ensure their quality and stability. Among proteins used in pharmaceutical applications, an important and ever increasing role is represented by monoclonal antibodies and large proteins, which are often modified to enhance their activity or stability when used as drugs. The bioactivity and the stability of those proteins are closely related to the maintenance of their complex structure, which however are influenced by many external factors that can cause degradation and/or aggregation. The presence of aggregates in these drugs could reduce their bioactivity and bioavailability, and induce immunogenicity. The choice of the proper analytical method for the analysis of aggregates is fundamental to understand their (size) dimensional range, their amount, and if they are present in the sample as generated by an aggregation or as an artifact due to the method itself. Size exclusion chromatography is one of the most important techniques for the quality control of pharmaceutical proteins; however, its application is limited to relatively low molar mass aggregates. Among the techniques for the size characterization of proteins, field-flow fractionation (FFF) represents a competitive choice because of its soft mechanism due to the absence of a stationary phase and application in a broader size range, from nanometer- to micrometer-sized analytes. In this paper, the microcolumn variant of FFF, the hollow-fiber flow FFF, was online coupled with multi-angle light scattering, and a method for the characterization of aggregates with high reproducibility and low limit of detection was demonstrated employing an avidin derivate as sample model

Hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle laser scattering detection for aggregation studies of therapeutic proteins Field-Flow Fractionation

RESCHIGLIAN, PIERLUIGI;RODA, BARBARA;ZATTONI, ANDREA;TANASE, OTILIA MAYA;MARASSI, VALENTINA;
2014

Abstract

The rapid development of protein-based pharmaceuticals highlights the need for robust analytical methods to ensure their quality and stability. Among proteins used in pharmaceutical applications, an important and ever increasing role is represented by monoclonal antibodies and large proteins, which are often modified to enhance their activity or stability when used as drugs. The bioactivity and the stability of those proteins are closely related to the maintenance of their complex structure, which however are influenced by many external factors that can cause degradation and/or aggregation. The presence of aggregates in these drugs could reduce their bioactivity and bioavailability, and induce immunogenicity. The choice of the proper analytical method for the analysis of aggregates is fundamental to understand their (size) dimensional range, their amount, and if they are present in the sample as generated by an aggregation or as an artifact due to the method itself. Size exclusion chromatography is one of the most important techniques for the quality control of pharmaceutical proteins; however, its application is limited to relatively low molar mass aggregates. Among the techniques for the size characterization of proteins, field-flow fractionation (FFF) represents a competitive choice because of its soft mechanism due to the absence of a stationary phase and application in a broader size range, from nanometer- to micrometer-sized analytes. In this paper, the microcolumn variant of FFF, the hollow-fiber flow FFF, was online coupled with multi-angle light scattering, and a method for the characterization of aggregates with high reproducibility and low limit of detection was demonstrated employing an avidin derivate as sample model
Reschiglian, P.; Roda, B.; Zattoni, A.; Tanase, M.; Marassi, V.; Serani, S.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/530198
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