Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a microsporidium that multiplies intracellularly in cells of the kidneys and in the central nervous system and is excreted as a spore in the urine. Non purulent interstitial nephritis is the only sign that is found at post-mortem inspection, the spore is infectious and is transmitted horizontally by ingestion of contaminated food or water, or more rarely by inhalation. However, cooked meat is considered to be safe. Post-mortem findings in rabbit slaughterhouses show that prevalence in farms in Emilia Romagna and Veneto is variable from zero to 30 percent, but infection affects many farms (over 90%) and human exposure to E. cuniculi may be common in farming environment and slaughterhouses. Although infections in humans are very rare and affect immunocompromised individuals, tissues and organs with high infectivity should be removed and the wastes disposed to prevent spreading of the very resistant spores, because these are infective not only for rabbits and other rodents, but also for domestic animals and humans. Intensive rearing, poor hygiene, overcrowding, moving animals, and the introduction of (unchecked) animals from outside, are all factors that help spread infection, that can be controlled also by appropriate treatments under veterinary supervision. Ante-mortem inspections of domestic rabbits should include evaluation of results of inspections in previous lots originating from the same farm in order to assure adequate control at post-mortem inspection. Adoption of hygienic measures in the farms and slaughterhouses to reduce the prevalence of the infection should be considered

Encefalitozoonosi del coniglio, rilievi ispettivi e situazione epidemiologica

TREVISANI, MARCELLO;MILITERNO, GIANFRANCO;MORANDI, FEDERICO;MARCATO, PAOLO STEFANO
2006

Abstract

Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a microsporidium that multiplies intracellularly in cells of the kidneys and in the central nervous system and is excreted as a spore in the urine. Non purulent interstitial nephritis is the only sign that is found at post-mortem inspection, the spore is infectious and is transmitted horizontally by ingestion of contaminated food or water, or more rarely by inhalation. However, cooked meat is considered to be safe. Post-mortem findings in rabbit slaughterhouses show that prevalence in farms in Emilia Romagna and Veneto is variable from zero to 30 percent, but infection affects many farms (over 90%) and human exposure to E. cuniculi may be common in farming environment and slaughterhouses. Although infections in humans are very rare and affect immunocompromised individuals, tissues and organs with high infectivity should be removed and the wastes disposed to prevent spreading of the very resistant spores, because these are infective not only for rabbits and other rodents, but also for domestic animals and humans. Intensive rearing, poor hygiene, overcrowding, moving animals, and the introduction of (unchecked) animals from outside, are all factors that help spread infection, that can be controlled also by appropriate treatments under veterinary supervision. Ante-mortem inspections of domestic rabbits should include evaluation of results of inspections in previous lots originating from the same farm in order to assure adequate control at post-mortem inspection. Adoption of hygienic measures in the farms and slaughterhouses to reduce the prevalence of the infection should be considered
Sicurezza Alimentare: Ruolo e Funzioni del Veterinario Ispettore Europeo
318
324
Taffetani L.; Trevisani M.; Militerno G.; Morandi F.; Marcato P.S.
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/29600
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact