The emergency regarding recent immigration waves into Italy makes continued healthcare monitoring of these populations necessary. METHODS: Through a survey of hospital admissions carried out during the last five years at the S. Orsola-Malpighi General Hospital of Bologna (Italy), all causes of admission of these subjects were evaluated, together with their correlates. Subsequently, we focused on admissions due to infectious diseases. All available data regarding foreign citizens admitted as inpatients or in Day-Hospital settings of our teaching hospital from January 1, 1999, to March 31, 2004, were assessed. Diagnosis-related group (DRG) features, and single discharge diagnoses, were also evaluated, and a further assessment of infectious diseases was subsequently made. RESULTS: Within a comprehensive pool of 339,051 hospitalized patients, foreign citizen discharges numbered 7,312 (2.15%), including 2,542 males (34.8%) and 4,769 females (65.2%). Males had a mean age of 36.8+/-14.7 years, while females were aged 30.8+/-12.2 years. In the assessment of the areas of origin, 34.6% of hospitalizations were attributed to patients coming from Eastern Europe, 15.3% from Northern Africa, 7.3% (comprehensively) from Western Europe and United States, 6.9% from the Indian subcontinent, 5.9% from sub-Saharan Africa, 5.7% from Latin America, 4.1% from China, 2.5% from the Philippines, and 1.1% from the Middle East. Among women, most hospitalizations (58.8%) were due to obstetrical-gynecological procedures or diseases, including assistance with delivery (27.1%), and pregnancy complications (18.7%), followed by psycho-social disturbances (5.9%), malignancies (5.1%), gastrointestinal diseases (4.7%), and voluntary pregnancy interruption (4.4%). Among men, the most frequent causes of admissions were related to trauma (15.9%), followed by gastroenteric disorders (12%), heart-vascular diseases (8.9%), psycho-social disorders (8.4%), respiratory (7.1%), kidney (6.1%), liver (5.2%), and metabolic (4.9%) diseases, and alcohol or substance abuse (4.2%). Infectious diseases (alone or with concurrent disorders) were reported in 881 discharged individuals, representing 12.1% of the 7,312 DRGs attributed to foreign patients. The comprehensive patient population discharged from our hospital with at least one infectious disease diagnosis had lower rates of respiratory tract infections, followed by chronic viral hepatitis, HIV infection and related diseases, enterocolitis, pulmonary tuberculosis, pyelonephritis, severe skin and soft tissue infection, meningoencephalitis, and malaria, as the most frequently-reported disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Our survey, through a combined analysis of both DRGs and discharge diagnoses, allowed us to conclude that 12.1% of foreign citizens hospitalized at our General teaching Hospital of Bologna (Italy) suffered from at least one infectious disease. Respiratory tract, liver, and gastrointestinal infections, and HIV infection, were found with an appreciable frequency among discharge diagnoses, while the frequency of malaria and meningoencephalitis was lower, compared with other series. Among disorders other than infectious diseases, obstetric-gynecological conditions and post-traumatic episodes (for male patients) were the most frequent causes of hospitalization.

Admission of foreign citizens to the general teaching hospital of Bologna, northeastern Italy: an epidemiological and clinical survey

BALDI, ELENA;MANFREDI, ROBERTO;CHIODO, FRANCESCO
2006

Abstract

The emergency regarding recent immigration waves into Italy makes continued healthcare monitoring of these populations necessary. METHODS: Through a survey of hospital admissions carried out during the last five years at the S. Orsola-Malpighi General Hospital of Bologna (Italy), all causes of admission of these subjects were evaluated, together with their correlates. Subsequently, we focused on admissions due to infectious diseases. All available data regarding foreign citizens admitted as inpatients or in Day-Hospital settings of our teaching hospital from January 1, 1999, to March 31, 2004, were assessed. Diagnosis-related group (DRG) features, and single discharge diagnoses, were also evaluated, and a further assessment of infectious diseases was subsequently made. RESULTS: Within a comprehensive pool of 339,051 hospitalized patients, foreign citizen discharges numbered 7,312 (2.15%), including 2,542 males (34.8%) and 4,769 females (65.2%). Males had a mean age of 36.8+/-14.7 years, while females were aged 30.8+/-12.2 years. In the assessment of the areas of origin, 34.6% of hospitalizations were attributed to patients coming from Eastern Europe, 15.3% from Northern Africa, 7.3% (comprehensively) from Western Europe and United States, 6.9% from the Indian subcontinent, 5.9% from sub-Saharan Africa, 5.7% from Latin America, 4.1% from China, 2.5% from the Philippines, and 1.1% from the Middle East. Among women, most hospitalizations (58.8%) were due to obstetrical-gynecological procedures or diseases, including assistance with delivery (27.1%), and pregnancy complications (18.7%), followed by psycho-social disturbances (5.9%), malignancies (5.1%), gastrointestinal diseases (4.7%), and voluntary pregnancy interruption (4.4%). Among men, the most frequent causes of admissions were related to trauma (15.9%), followed by gastroenteric disorders (12%), heart-vascular diseases (8.9%), psycho-social disorders (8.4%), respiratory (7.1%), kidney (6.1%), liver (5.2%), and metabolic (4.9%) diseases, and alcohol or substance abuse (4.2%). Infectious diseases (alone or with concurrent disorders) were reported in 881 discharged individuals, representing 12.1% of the 7,312 DRGs attributed to foreign patients. The comprehensive patient population discharged from our hospital with at least one infectious disease diagnosis had lower rates of respiratory tract infections, followed by chronic viral hepatitis, HIV infection and related diseases, enterocolitis, pulmonary tuberculosis, pyelonephritis, severe skin and soft tissue infection, meningoencephalitis, and malaria, as the most frequently-reported disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Our survey, through a combined analysis of both DRGs and discharge diagnoses, allowed us to conclude that 12.1% of foreign citizens hospitalized at our General teaching Hospital of Bologna (Italy) suffered from at least one infectious disease. Respiratory tract, liver, and gastrointestinal infections, and HIV infection, were found with an appreciable frequency among discharge diagnoses, while the frequency of malaria and meningoencephalitis was lower, compared with other series. Among disorders other than infectious diseases, obstetric-gynecological conditions and post-traumatic episodes (for male patients) were the most frequent causes of hospitalization.
S. Sabbatani; E. Baldi; R. Manfredi; F. Chiodo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/28881
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