Abstract. Recent work has examined the feasibility of roboticassisted gait training in pediatric patients, including children with cerebral palsy (CP). Herein we present a case series describing clinical outcomes in four children diagnosed with spastic diplegia due to CP who underwent gait training using a robotic driven gait orthosis (DGO) (Pediatric Lokoma c ). The children were paired based on functional abilities and observed gait characteristics. Two children were classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level II and displayed a crouch gait pattern. The other two children were classified as GMFCS level III and exhibited a toewalking gait pattern. Each child participated in a 6week intervention of roboticassisted gait training that involved three 30minute sessions per week. One child of each GMFCS level underwent training using the augmented feedback module of the Pediatric Lokomat c system, while the other child of each pair underwent training without using the augmented feedback module. Pretraining, posttraining, and 3month followup evaluations were performed including clinical tests of standing and walking function (Gross Motor Function Measure, GMFM, sections D and E, respectively), walking speed, and walking endurance. Clinical gait analysis was also performed during each evaluation using a motion capture system to assess changes in gait biomechanics. All children showed an improvement in gait speed. For the lower functioning children (i.e.GMFCS level III), this may be mediated by improved trunk control suggested by concomitantly large increases in standing function (i.e. GMFM section D). Conversely, for the higher functioning children (i.e. GMFCS level II), large changes were observed in walking function assessed by the GMFM section E. The use of augmented feedback was associated with larger improvements in walking function (i.e. GMFM section E) and in walking speed. Furthermore, subjects who received roboticassisted gait training in combination with augmented feedback showed a large increase in endurance while subjects who received roboticassisted gait training without augmented feedback showed limited or no improvements in endurance. Overall, these results suggest that the use of an augmented feedback module in combination with roboticassisted gait training leads to better outcomes than roboticassisted gait training without augmented feedback.

The role of augmented feedback in pediatric roboticassisted gait training: A case series

BENEDETTI, MARIA GRAZIA;
2010

Abstract

Abstract. Recent work has examined the feasibility of roboticassisted gait training in pediatric patients, including children with cerebral palsy (CP). Herein we present a case series describing clinical outcomes in four children diagnosed with spastic diplegia due to CP who underwent gait training using a robotic driven gait orthosis (DGO) (Pediatric Lokoma c ). The children were paired based on functional abilities and observed gait characteristics. Two children were classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level II and displayed a crouch gait pattern. The other two children were classified as GMFCS level III and exhibited a toewalking gait pattern. Each child participated in a 6week intervention of roboticassisted gait training that involved three 30minute sessions per week. One child of each GMFCS level underwent training using the augmented feedback module of the Pediatric Lokomat c system, while the other child of each pair underwent training without using the augmented feedback module. Pretraining, posttraining, and 3month followup evaluations were performed including clinical tests of standing and walking function (Gross Motor Function Measure, GMFM, sections D and E, respectively), walking speed, and walking endurance. Clinical gait analysis was also performed during each evaluation using a motion capture system to assess changes in gait biomechanics. All children showed an improvement in gait speed. For the lower functioning children (i.e.GMFCS level III), this may be mediated by improved trunk control suggested by concomitantly large increases in standing function (i.e. GMFM section D). Conversely, for the higher functioning children (i.e. GMFCS level II), large changes were observed in walking function assessed by the GMFM section E. The use of augmented feedback was associated with larger improvements in walking function (i.e. GMFM section E) and in walking speed. Furthermore, subjects who received roboticassisted gait training in combination with augmented feedback showed a large increase in endurance while subjects who received roboticassisted gait training without augmented feedback showed limited or no improvements in endurance. Overall, these results suggest that the use of an augmented feedback module in combination with roboticassisted gait training leads to better outcomes than roboticassisted gait training without augmented feedback.
Patritti B.; Sicari M.; Deming L; Romaguera F.; Pelliccio M.M.; Kasi P.; Benedetti M.G.; Nimec D.L.; Bonato P.
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/99974
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact