Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) and feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) are single-stranded DNA viruses belonging to the genus Parvovirus of the Parvoviridae family, that are responsible for hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and leukopenia, mainly in pups and kittens, with high mortality rates. CPV-2, emerged in the late 1970s, appeared to be a host-range variant of FPV, since is evolved from FPV or other FPV-like viruses infecting wild carnivores, such as mink, raccoons or foxes. After its emergence, the original CPV-2 continued to evolve and was completely replaced by the new variants CPV-2a, 2b and 2c that have gained the feline host range and they are able to infect both dogs and cats whereas the original CPV-2 does not replicate in cats. The recent emergence of CPV-2 represents one of the few examples where the process of cross-species viral transmission has been observed in real-time. Furthermore, the successive species jump of CPV-new variants from dogs to cats, constitutes a valuable model of a successful cross-species transmission event. Since the process of virus transfer to a new host (viral host switching) is rarely observed directly, we have investigated the evolution of CPV in domestic cats. In the study described here, we report the detection of co-infection by multiple CPV variants, the high genetic complexity of CPV-2 strains and a mixed infection FPV/CPV, detected in domestic cats. These findings display the higher within-host genetic diversity of CPV in cats than in dogs, confirming the importance of the viral host switching as mechanism for the emergence of new viruses.

Parvovirus infections in cats: an example of cross-species virus transmission

BATTILANI, MARA;BALBONI, ANDREA
2010

Abstract

Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) and feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) are single-stranded DNA viruses belonging to the genus Parvovirus of the Parvoviridae family, that are responsible for hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and leukopenia, mainly in pups and kittens, with high mortality rates. CPV-2, emerged in the late 1970s, appeared to be a host-range variant of FPV, since is evolved from FPV or other FPV-like viruses infecting wild carnivores, such as mink, raccoons or foxes. After its emergence, the original CPV-2 continued to evolve and was completely replaced by the new variants CPV-2a, 2b and 2c that have gained the feline host range and they are able to infect both dogs and cats whereas the original CPV-2 does not replicate in cats. The recent emergence of CPV-2 represents one of the few examples where the process of cross-species viral transmission has been observed in real-time. Furthermore, the successive species jump of CPV-new variants from dogs to cats, constitutes a valuable model of a successful cross-species transmission event. Since the process of virus transfer to a new host (viral host switching) is rarely observed directly, we have investigated the evolution of CPV in domestic cats. In the study described here, we report the detection of co-infection by multiple CPV variants, the high genetic complexity of CPV-2 strains and a mixed infection FPV/CPV, detected in domestic cats. These findings display the higher within-host genetic diversity of CPV in cats than in dogs, confirming the importance of the viral host switching as mechanism for the emergence of new viruses.
Globalization of Tropical Animal Diseases and Public Health Concerns
122
124
Battilani M.; Balboni A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/99157
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