Neanderthal anterior teeth are very large and have a distinctive morphology characterized by robust 'shovelshaped' crowns. These features are frequently seen as adaptive responses in dissipating heavy mechanical loads resulting from masticatory and non-masticatory activities. Although the long-standing debate surrounding this hypothesis has played a central role in paleoanthropology, is still unclear if Neanderthal anterior teeth can resist high mechanical loads or not. A novel way to answer this question is to use a multidisciplinary approach that considers together tooth architecture, dental wear and jaw movements. The aim of this study is to functionally reposition the teeth of Le Moustier 1 (a Neanderthal adolescent) and Qafzeh 9 (an early Homo sapiens adolescent) derived from wear facet mapping, occlusal fingerprint analysis and physical dental restoration methods. The restored dental arches are then used to perform finite element analysis on the left central maxillary incisor during edge-to-edge occlusion. The results show stress distribution differences between Le Moustier 1 and Qafzeh 9, with the former displaying higher tensile stress in enamel around the lingual fossa but lower concentration of stress in the lingual aspect of the root surface. These results seem to suggest that the presence of labial convexity, lingual tubercle and of a large root surface in Le Moustier 1 incisor helps in dissipating mechanical stress. The absence of these dental features in Qafzeh 9 is compensated by the presence of a thicker enamel, which helps in reducing the stress in the tooth crown.

Najafzadeh, A., Hernaiz-García, M., Benazzi, S., Chen, B., Hublin, J., Kullmer, O., et al. (2024). Finite element analysis of Neanderthal and early Homo sapiens maxillary central incisor. JOURNAL OF HUMAN EVOLUTION, 189, 1-14 [10.1016/j.jhevol.2024.103512].

Finite element analysis of Neanderthal and early Homo sapiens maxillary central incisor

Benazzi, Stefano;Kullmer, Ottmar;Sorrentino, Rita;Vazzana, Antonino;
2024

Abstract

Neanderthal anterior teeth are very large and have a distinctive morphology characterized by robust 'shovelshaped' crowns. These features are frequently seen as adaptive responses in dissipating heavy mechanical loads resulting from masticatory and non-masticatory activities. Although the long-standing debate surrounding this hypothesis has played a central role in paleoanthropology, is still unclear if Neanderthal anterior teeth can resist high mechanical loads or not. A novel way to answer this question is to use a multidisciplinary approach that considers together tooth architecture, dental wear and jaw movements. The aim of this study is to functionally reposition the teeth of Le Moustier 1 (a Neanderthal adolescent) and Qafzeh 9 (an early Homo sapiens adolescent) derived from wear facet mapping, occlusal fingerprint analysis and physical dental restoration methods. The restored dental arches are then used to perform finite element analysis on the left central maxillary incisor during edge-to-edge occlusion. The results show stress distribution differences between Le Moustier 1 and Qafzeh 9, with the former displaying higher tensile stress in enamel around the lingual fossa but lower concentration of stress in the lingual aspect of the root surface. These results seem to suggest that the presence of labial convexity, lingual tubercle and of a large root surface in Le Moustier 1 incisor helps in dissipating mechanical stress. The absence of these dental features in Qafzeh 9 is compensated by the presence of a thicker enamel, which helps in reducing the stress in the tooth crown.
2024
Najafzadeh, A., Hernaiz-García, M., Benazzi, S., Chen, B., Hublin, J., Kullmer, O., et al. (2024). Finite element analysis of Neanderthal and early Homo sapiens maxillary central incisor. JOURNAL OF HUMAN EVOLUTION, 189, 1-14 [10.1016/j.jhevol.2024.103512].
Najafzadeh, Ali; Hernaiz-García, María; Benazzi, Stefano; Chen, Bernard; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Kullmer, Ottmar; Pokhojaev, Ariel; Sarig, Rachel; Sorre...espandi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/969764
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