Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents the most frequent type of dementia in elderly people. Two major forms of the disease exist: sporadic-the causes of which have not yet been fully understood -and familial-inherited within families from generation to generation, with a clear autosomal dominant transmission of mutations in Presenilin 1 (PSEN1), 2 (PSEN2) or Amyloid Precursors Protein (APP) genes. The main hallmark of AD consists of extra -cellular deposits of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide and intracellular deposits of the hyperphosphorylated form of the tau protein. An ever-growing body of research supports the viral infectious hypothesis of sporadic forms of AD. In particular, it has been shown that several herpes viruses (i.e., HHV-1, HHV-2, HHV-3 or varicella zoster virus, HHV-4 or Epstein Barr virus, HHV-5 or cytomegalovirus, HHV-6A and B, HHV-7), flaviviruses (i.e., Zika virus, Dengue fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus) as well as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), hepatitis viruses (HAV, HBV, HCV, HDV, HEV), SARS-CoV2, Ljungan virus (LV), Influenza A virus and Borna disease virus, could increase the risk of AD. Here, we summarized and discussed these results. Based on these findings, sig-nificant issues for future studies are also put forward.

Bruno, F., Abondio, P., Bruno, R., Ceraudo, L., Paparazzo, E., Citrigno, L., et al. (2023). Alzheimer's disease as a viral disease: Revisiting the infectious hypothesis. AGEING RESEARCH REVIEWS, 91, 1-21 [10.1016/j.arr.2023.102068].

Alzheimer's disease as a viral disease: Revisiting the infectious hypothesis

Abondio, Paolo
Co-primo
;
Luiselli, Donata;
2023

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents the most frequent type of dementia in elderly people. Two major forms of the disease exist: sporadic-the causes of which have not yet been fully understood -and familial-inherited within families from generation to generation, with a clear autosomal dominant transmission of mutations in Presenilin 1 (PSEN1), 2 (PSEN2) or Amyloid Precursors Protein (APP) genes. The main hallmark of AD consists of extra -cellular deposits of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide and intracellular deposits of the hyperphosphorylated form of the tau protein. An ever-growing body of research supports the viral infectious hypothesis of sporadic forms of AD. In particular, it has been shown that several herpes viruses (i.e., HHV-1, HHV-2, HHV-3 or varicella zoster virus, HHV-4 or Epstein Barr virus, HHV-5 or cytomegalovirus, HHV-6A and B, HHV-7), flaviviruses (i.e., Zika virus, Dengue fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus) as well as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), hepatitis viruses (HAV, HBV, HCV, HDV, HEV), SARS-CoV2, Ljungan virus (LV), Influenza A virus and Borna disease virus, could increase the risk of AD. Here, we summarized and discussed these results. Based on these findings, sig-nificant issues for future studies are also put forward.
2023
Bruno, F., Abondio, P., Bruno, R., Ceraudo, L., Paparazzo, E., Citrigno, L., et al. (2023). Alzheimer's disease as a viral disease: Revisiting the infectious hypothesis. AGEING RESEARCH REVIEWS, 91, 1-21 [10.1016/j.arr.2023.102068].
Bruno, Francesco; Abondio, Paolo; Bruno, Rossella; Ceraudo, Leognano; Paparazzo, Ersilia; Citrigno, Luigi; Luiselli, Donata; Bruni, Amalia C; Passarin...espandi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/963453
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