Importance: Demoralization, characterized by a persistent inability to cope, as well as helplessness, hopelessness, and despair, is highly prevalent in oncology, with between 36% to 52% of patients exhibiting demoralization syndrome. Given established evidence linking demoralization in patients with cancer to physical symptom burden, quality of life, sleep disturbance, and suicidality, assessment and treatment of demoralization syndrome is critical for optimizing clinical and psychosocial outcomes. Observations: The term “demoralization” is highly relevant to the care of patients with cancer facing life-limiting illnesses. Indeed, demoralization can be conceptualized as a feeling state characterized by the perception of being unable to cope with some pressing problems and/or of lack of adequate support from others. Despite a considerable overlap in symptoms, demoralization and depression should be regarded as distinct and independent clinical syndromes. Patients who are demoralized but not clinically depressed often describe a sense of subjective incompetence and do not report anhedonia (i.e., loss of interest and inability to enjoy things). Although the definition of demoralization is now included as a distinct syndrome in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11, it has been neglected by the current U.S. official nosology in psychiatry, such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-5-TR). As such, demoralization syndrome may be under- or misdiagnosed and treated ineffectively in the oncology setting, potentially prolonging suffering and influencing cancer outcomes. Conclusions and relevance: Optimization of methods to diagnose and assess demoralization syndrome is critical to underpin rigorous studies evaluating the efficacy of psychotherapeutic and pharmacological interventions for patients with cancer experiencing demoralization. Our review supports the use of specific diagnostic criteria for demoralization in cancer patients, introduces methodological considerations relevant to treatment studies, and presents a novel measurement approach to the assessment of demoralization severity with the Clinical Interview for Demoralization (CIDE).

Distinguishing and treating demoralization syndrome in cancer: A review / Fava Maurizio; Sorg Emily; Jacobs Jamie; Leadbetter Robert; Guidi Jenny. - In: GENERAL HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRY. - ISSN 0163-8343. - STAMPA. - 85:(2023), pp. 185-190. [10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2023.10.004]

Distinguishing and treating demoralization syndrome in cancer: A review.

Guidi Jenny
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Importance: Demoralization, characterized by a persistent inability to cope, as well as helplessness, hopelessness, and despair, is highly prevalent in oncology, with between 36% to 52% of patients exhibiting demoralization syndrome. Given established evidence linking demoralization in patients with cancer to physical symptom burden, quality of life, sleep disturbance, and suicidality, assessment and treatment of demoralization syndrome is critical for optimizing clinical and psychosocial outcomes. Observations: The term “demoralization” is highly relevant to the care of patients with cancer facing life-limiting illnesses. Indeed, demoralization can be conceptualized as a feeling state characterized by the perception of being unable to cope with some pressing problems and/or of lack of adequate support from others. Despite a considerable overlap in symptoms, demoralization and depression should be regarded as distinct and independent clinical syndromes. Patients who are demoralized but not clinically depressed often describe a sense of subjective incompetence and do not report anhedonia (i.e., loss of interest and inability to enjoy things). Although the definition of demoralization is now included as a distinct syndrome in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11, it has been neglected by the current U.S. official nosology in psychiatry, such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-5-TR). As such, demoralization syndrome may be under- or misdiagnosed and treated ineffectively in the oncology setting, potentially prolonging suffering and influencing cancer outcomes. Conclusions and relevance: Optimization of methods to diagnose and assess demoralization syndrome is critical to underpin rigorous studies evaluating the efficacy of psychotherapeutic and pharmacological interventions for patients with cancer experiencing demoralization. Our review supports the use of specific diagnostic criteria for demoralization in cancer patients, introduces methodological considerations relevant to treatment studies, and presents a novel measurement approach to the assessment of demoralization severity with the Clinical Interview for Demoralization (CIDE).
2023
Distinguishing and treating demoralization syndrome in cancer: A review / Fava Maurizio; Sorg Emily; Jacobs Jamie; Leadbetter Robert; Guidi Jenny. - In: GENERAL HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRY. - ISSN 0163-8343. - STAMPA. - 85:(2023), pp. 185-190. [10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2023.10.004]
Fava Maurizio; Sorg Emily; Jacobs Jamie; Leadbetter Robert; Guidi Jenny
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/962083
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