In natural forest, disturbance changes tree species composition which in turn affects soil properties. Two areas in the Central Forest State Biosphere Reserve, in the Russian Southern Taiga Zone, differed in the intensity of disturbance: Norway spruce was the dominant species at one site, while at the other spruce was mixed with broadleaves. The presence of broadleaves was due to large gaps in the canopy having been formed, which have triggered vegetation succession. At both sites, five plots were selected to evaluate how the presence of broadleaves influences the properties of the soils under spruce. Soil samples were taken close to spruce trees and the O, A and E horizons were analysed. A difference in the distribution of organic matter in the soil horizons was evident, with a higher concentration in the O and A horizons at the spruce dominated site, while a more homogeneous distribution was found under spruce at the site where broadleaves were abundant. The organic matter did not only differ in quantity, but also in quality as estimated by the C/N ratio, and therefore affected the CEC and element relative availability. No differences at the two sites were found for water-extractable and exchangeable elements, but the ratio between the exchangeable and the acid extractable forms were different, suggesting a higher relative availability of the elements at the spruce dominated site, and thus potentially higher leaching. Both theoretical and empirical studies have suggested that podzolisation and accumulation of organic matter in the O horizon are related to stagnation of ecosystem processes and ecosystem decline. Our data suggest that the presence to windthrow sites and the inclusion of broadleaf species acts to slow or even reverse podzolisation even in spruce dominated sites.

Soil properties under Norway spruce differ in spruce dominated and mixed broadleaf forests of the Southern Taiga

FALSONE, GLORIA;
2008

Abstract

In natural forest, disturbance changes tree species composition which in turn affects soil properties. Two areas in the Central Forest State Biosphere Reserve, in the Russian Southern Taiga Zone, differed in the intensity of disturbance: Norway spruce was the dominant species at one site, while at the other spruce was mixed with broadleaves. The presence of broadleaves was due to large gaps in the canopy having been formed, which have triggered vegetation succession. At both sites, five plots were selected to evaluate how the presence of broadleaves influences the properties of the soils under spruce. Soil samples were taken close to spruce trees and the O, A and E horizons were analysed. A difference in the distribution of organic matter in the soil horizons was evident, with a higher concentration in the O and A horizons at the spruce dominated site, while a more homogeneous distribution was found under spruce at the site where broadleaves were abundant. The organic matter did not only differ in quantity, but also in quality as estimated by the C/N ratio, and therefore affected the CEC and element relative availability. No differences at the two sites were found for water-extractable and exchangeable elements, but the ratio between the exchangeable and the acid extractable forms were different, suggesting a higher relative availability of the elements at the spruce dominated site, and thus potentially higher leaching. Both theoretical and empirical studies have suggested that podzolisation and accumulation of organic matter in the O horizon are related to stagnation of ecosystem processes and ecosystem decline. Our data suggest that the presence to windthrow sites and the inclusion of broadleaf species acts to slow or even reverse podzolisation even in spruce dominated sites.
Bonifacio E.; Caimi A.; Falsone G.; Trofimov S.; Zanini E.; Godbold D.L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/95692
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