Rutile, titanite, and ilmenite are the most common Ti-bearing minerals in metamorphic rocks. Experimental constraints have shown that titanite is stable at low-grade metamorphic conditions, rutile at high pressure (HP), and ilmenite at high temperature, low pressure (HT-LP) conditions. Yet, petrological evidence suggests that titanite can also be stable at low temperature, HP (LT-HP). This implies that both titanite and rutile can be used to develop proxies to track HP metamorphism, which can have interesting applications. In this study, we have investigated the natural occurrence and chemistry of Ti-bearing minerals in gabbroic rocks and basalts that record different degrees of metamorphism, including LP amphibole-bearing gabbros from the ocean floor (Mid-Atlantic and Indian ridge IODP LEGs) and from an obducted ophiolite (Chenaillet) and HP Alpine metagabbros and metabasalts, including blueschist and eclogite facies rocks from the Western Alps and Corsica. We have performed detailed petrography, Raman spectroscopy and analyzed major and trace elements mineral chemistry using EPMA and LA-ICPMS. We found that rutile is stable at low pressure (< 2 kbar) in ocean-floor amphibole-bearing gabbros, lower than experimental constraints had previously suggested. Rutile is also found in eclogitic metagabbros from the Western Alps and can be chemically distinguished from LP rutile. Blueschist metagabbros from the Western Alps and eclogitic metabasalts from Corsica have titanite stable instead of rutile. While the titanite to rutile transition is pressure- and temperature-dependent, we demonstrate how small variations in bulk-rock Ti/Ca and Ca/Al values within the NCKFMASHTO chemical system may shift their stabilities. High-pressure titanite from these metamafic rocks exhibits La depletion and low La/Sm-N values in comparison to titanite from amphibolite-facies mafic rocks. La/Sm-N or Nb together with Yb and V can be used to distinguish HP titanite from titanite formed under other P-T settings. These new systematics can be useful in studies using detrital Ti-bearing minerals to probe the HP metamorphic record through time.

Ti-Bearing Minerals: from the Ocean Floor to Subduction and Back / Pereira, Inês; Bruand, Emilie; Nicollet, Christian; Koga, Kenneth T; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto. - In: JOURNAL OF PETROLOGY. - ISSN 0022-3530. - ELETTRONICO. - 64:7(2023), pp. egad041.1-egad041.26. [10.1093/petrology/egad041]

Ti-Bearing Minerals: from the Ocean Floor to Subduction and Back

Vitale Brovarone, Alberto
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Rutile, titanite, and ilmenite are the most common Ti-bearing minerals in metamorphic rocks. Experimental constraints have shown that titanite is stable at low-grade metamorphic conditions, rutile at high pressure (HP), and ilmenite at high temperature, low pressure (HT-LP) conditions. Yet, petrological evidence suggests that titanite can also be stable at low temperature, HP (LT-HP). This implies that both titanite and rutile can be used to develop proxies to track HP metamorphism, which can have interesting applications. In this study, we have investigated the natural occurrence and chemistry of Ti-bearing minerals in gabbroic rocks and basalts that record different degrees of metamorphism, including LP amphibole-bearing gabbros from the ocean floor (Mid-Atlantic and Indian ridge IODP LEGs) and from an obducted ophiolite (Chenaillet) and HP Alpine metagabbros and metabasalts, including blueschist and eclogite facies rocks from the Western Alps and Corsica. We have performed detailed petrography, Raman spectroscopy and analyzed major and trace elements mineral chemistry using EPMA and LA-ICPMS. We found that rutile is stable at low pressure (< 2 kbar) in ocean-floor amphibole-bearing gabbros, lower than experimental constraints had previously suggested. Rutile is also found in eclogitic metagabbros from the Western Alps and can be chemically distinguished from LP rutile. Blueschist metagabbros from the Western Alps and eclogitic metabasalts from Corsica have titanite stable instead of rutile. While the titanite to rutile transition is pressure- and temperature-dependent, we demonstrate how small variations in bulk-rock Ti/Ca and Ca/Al values within the NCKFMASHTO chemical system may shift their stabilities. High-pressure titanite from these metamafic rocks exhibits La depletion and low La/Sm-N values in comparison to titanite from amphibolite-facies mafic rocks. La/Sm-N or Nb together with Yb and V can be used to distinguish HP titanite from titanite formed under other P-T settings. These new systematics can be useful in studies using detrital Ti-bearing minerals to probe the HP metamorphic record through time.
2023
Ti-Bearing Minerals: from the Ocean Floor to Subduction and Back / Pereira, Inês; Bruand, Emilie; Nicollet, Christian; Koga, Kenneth T; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto. - In: JOURNAL OF PETROLOGY. - ISSN 0022-3530. - ELETTRONICO. - 64:7(2023), pp. egad041.1-egad041.26. [10.1093/petrology/egad041]
Pereira, Inês; Bruand, Emilie; Nicollet, Christian; Koga, Kenneth T; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
web_material_egad041.zip

accesso aperto

Tipo: File Supplementare
Licenza: Licenza per Accesso Aperto. Creative Commons Attribuzione (CCBY)
Dimensione 3.12 MB
Formato Zip File
3.12 MB Zip File Visualizza/Apri
egad041.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipo: Versione (PDF) editoriale
Licenza: Licenza per Accesso Aperto. Creative Commons Attribuzione (CCBY)
Dimensione 5.93 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
5.93 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/955381
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact