Background and Aim: Seasonal changes, especially temperature and photoperiod, are well-known determining factors of swine reproductive capacity, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of age and seasonal variations on boar seminal plasma steroids (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA], cortisol [CORT], and testosterone [TEST]) over 1 year.Materials and Methods: Four commercial hybrid adult boars (Large White x Duroc), aged between 12 and 44 months, were repeatedly evaluated at the Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences of the University of Bologna. Daily temperature and light hours relating to the collection date were considered for each observation within the four astronomical seasons: Winter, spring, summer, and autumn. Hormones were quantified using radioimmunoassay. The association between seasonal factors and hormone concentrations was evaluated using linear regression models. Univariate models were estimated for each hormone to assess the influence of the independent variables; two multivariate models were assessed to evaluate the effect of temperature and daylight hours, including boar and season factors.Results: Age significantly affected all analyzed hormones (CORT p < 0.0001; DHEA p < 0.0001; and TEST p < 0.0001). The highest average levels were found for each hormone during summertime, suggesting a positive correlation between steroid concentrations with temperature and light hours.Conclusion: The results of this study support the hypothesis that the increase in external temperature and light hours is somehow associated with higher levels of steroid concentrations in the seminal plasma of in-housed boars. These findings may help further investigate seasonal fluctuations in reproductive outcomes, which are well-known for porcine species.

Influence of age and seasonality on boar seminal plasma steroids quantification: A preliminary study

Aniballi, C
Primo
;
Elmi, A
;
Govoni, N;Casalini, A;Bacci, ML;Ventrella, D
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Background and Aim: Seasonal changes, especially temperature and photoperiod, are well-known determining factors of swine reproductive capacity, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of age and seasonal variations on boar seminal plasma steroids (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA], cortisol [CORT], and testosterone [TEST]) over 1 year.Materials and Methods: Four commercial hybrid adult boars (Large White x Duroc), aged between 12 and 44 months, were repeatedly evaluated at the Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences of the University of Bologna. Daily temperature and light hours relating to the collection date were considered for each observation within the four astronomical seasons: Winter, spring, summer, and autumn. Hormones were quantified using radioimmunoassay. The association between seasonal factors and hormone concentrations was evaluated using linear regression models. Univariate models were estimated for each hormone to assess the influence of the independent variables; two multivariate models were assessed to evaluate the effect of temperature and daylight hours, including boar and season factors.Results: Age significantly affected all analyzed hormones (CORT p < 0.0001; DHEA p < 0.0001; and TEST p < 0.0001). The highest average levels were found for each hormone during summertime, suggesting a positive correlation between steroid concentrations with temperature and light hours.Conclusion: The results of this study support the hypothesis that the increase in external temperature and light hours is somehow associated with higher levels of steroid concentrations in the seminal plasma of in-housed boars. These findings may help further investigate seasonal fluctuations in reproductive outcomes, which are well-known for porcine species.
2023
Aniballi, C; Elmi, A; Govoni, N; Bulla, T; Canelli, E; Casalini, A; Bacci, ML; Ventrella, D
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/949462
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