Obesity is characterized by the accumulation of dysfunctional adipose tissues, which predisposes to cardiometabolic diseases. Our previous in vitro studies demonstrated a role of hypoxia in inducing adipokine hypomethylation in adipocytes. We sought to examine this mechanism in visceral adipose tissues (VATs) from obese individuals and its correlation with cardiometabolic risk factors. We propose an involvement of the hypoxia-inducible factor, HIF1α, and the DNA hydroxymethylase, TET1. Blood samples and VAT biopsies were obtained from obese and non-obese subjects (n = 60 each) having bariatric and elective surgeries, respectively. The analyses of VAT showed lower vascularity, and higher levels of HIF1α and TET1 proteins in the obese subjects than controls. Global hypomethylation and hydroxymethylation were observed in VAT from obese subjects along with promoter hypomethylation of several pro-inflammatory adipokines. TET1 protein was enriched near the promotor of the hypomethylated adipokines. The average levels of adipokine methylation correlated positively with vascularity and arteriolar vasoreactivity and negatively with protein levels of HIF1α and TET1 in corresponding VAT samples, serum and tissue inflammatory markers, and other cardiometabolic risk factors. These findings suggest a role for adipose tissue hypoxia in causing epigenetic alterations, which could explain the increased production of adipocytokines and ultimately, vascular dysfunction in obesity.

Adipose Tissue Hypoxia Correlates with Adipokine Hypomethylation and Vascular Dysfunction / Ali MM; Hassan C; Masrur M; Bianco FM; Naquiallah D; Mirza I; Frederick P; Fernandes ET; Giulianotti CP; Gangemi A; Phillips SA and Mahmoud AM. - In: BIOMEDICINES. - ISSN 2227-9059. - ELETTRONICO. - 9:(2021), pp. 1034.1-1034.22. [10.3390/biomedicines9081034]

Adipose Tissue Hypoxia Correlates with Adipokine Hypomethylation and Vascular Dysfunction

Gangemi A;
2021

Abstract

Obesity is characterized by the accumulation of dysfunctional adipose tissues, which predisposes to cardiometabolic diseases. Our previous in vitro studies demonstrated a role of hypoxia in inducing adipokine hypomethylation in adipocytes. We sought to examine this mechanism in visceral adipose tissues (VATs) from obese individuals and its correlation with cardiometabolic risk factors. We propose an involvement of the hypoxia-inducible factor, HIF1α, and the DNA hydroxymethylase, TET1. Blood samples and VAT biopsies were obtained from obese and non-obese subjects (n = 60 each) having bariatric and elective surgeries, respectively. The analyses of VAT showed lower vascularity, and higher levels of HIF1α and TET1 proteins in the obese subjects than controls. Global hypomethylation and hydroxymethylation were observed in VAT from obese subjects along with promoter hypomethylation of several pro-inflammatory adipokines. TET1 protein was enriched near the promotor of the hypomethylated adipokines. The average levels of adipokine methylation correlated positively with vascularity and arteriolar vasoreactivity and negatively with protein levels of HIF1α and TET1 in corresponding VAT samples, serum and tissue inflammatory markers, and other cardiometabolic risk factors. These findings suggest a role for adipose tissue hypoxia in causing epigenetic alterations, which could explain the increased production of adipocytokines and ultimately, vascular dysfunction in obesity.
2021
Adipose Tissue Hypoxia Correlates with Adipokine Hypomethylation and Vascular Dysfunction / Ali MM; Hassan C; Masrur M; Bianco FM; Naquiallah D; Mirza I; Frederick P; Fernandes ET; Giulianotti CP; Gangemi A; Phillips SA and Mahmoud AM. - In: BIOMEDICINES. - ISSN 2227-9059. - ELETTRONICO. - 9:(2021), pp. 1034.1-1034.22. [10.3390/biomedicines9081034]
Ali MM; Hassan C; Masrur M; Bianco FM; Naquiallah D; Mirza I; Frederick P; Fernandes ET; Giulianotti CP; Gangemi A; Phillips SA and Mahmoud AM
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/944038
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