Current cancer research is limited by the availability of reliable in vivo and in vitro models that are able to reproduce the fundamental hallmarks of cancer. Animal experimentation is of paramount importance in the progress of research, but it is becoming more evident that it has several limitations due to the numerous differences between animal tissues and real, in vivo human tissues. 3D bioprinting techniques have become an attractive tool for many basic and applied research fields. Concerning cancer, this technology has enabled the development of three-dimensional in vitro tumor models that recreate the characteristics of real tissues and look extremely promising for studying cancer cell biology. As 3D bioprinting is a relatively recently developed technique, there is still a lack of characterization of the chemical cellular microenvironment of 3D bioprinted constructs. In this work, we fabricated a cervical tumor model obtained by 3D bioprinting of HeLa cells in an alginate-based matrix. Characterization of the spheroid population obtained as a function of culturing time was performed by phase-contrast and confocal fluorescence microscopies. Scanning electrochemical microscopy and platinum nanoelectrodes were employed to characterize oxygen concentrations - a fundamental characteristic of the cellular microenvironment - with a high spatial resolution within the 3D bioprinted cervical tumor model; we also demonstrated that the diffusion of a molecular model of drugs in the 3D bioprinted construct, in which the spheroids were embedded, could be measured quantitatively over time using scanning electrochemical microscopy

Nano-Electrochemical Characterization of a 3D Bioprinted Cervical Tumor Model

Maila Becconi
Primo
;
Simona De Zio
Secondo
;
Francesco Falciani;Marzia Santamaria;Marco Malferrari
Penultimo
;
Stefania Rapino
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Current cancer research is limited by the availability of reliable in vivo and in vitro models that are able to reproduce the fundamental hallmarks of cancer. Animal experimentation is of paramount importance in the progress of research, but it is becoming more evident that it has several limitations due to the numerous differences between animal tissues and real, in vivo human tissues. 3D bioprinting techniques have become an attractive tool for many basic and applied research fields. Concerning cancer, this technology has enabled the development of three-dimensional in vitro tumor models that recreate the characteristics of real tissues and look extremely promising for studying cancer cell biology. As 3D bioprinting is a relatively recently developed technique, there is still a lack of characterization of the chemical cellular microenvironment of 3D bioprinted constructs. In this work, we fabricated a cervical tumor model obtained by 3D bioprinting of HeLa cells in an alginate-based matrix. Characterization of the spheroid population obtained as a function of culturing time was performed by phase-contrast and confocal fluorescence microscopies. Scanning electrochemical microscopy and platinum nanoelectrodes were employed to characterize oxygen concentrations - a fundamental characteristic of the cellular microenvironment - with a high spatial resolution within the 3D bioprinted cervical tumor model; we also demonstrated that the diffusion of a molecular model of drugs in the 3D bioprinted construct, in which the spheroids were embedded, could be measured quantitatively over time using scanning electrochemical microscopy
2023
Maila Becconi, Simona De Zio, Francesco Falciani, Marzia Santamaria, Marco Malferrari, Stefania Rapino
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/919756
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