Several studies have outlined that changes in the honeybee gut microbial composition may impair important metabolic functions supporting the honeybees’ life. Gut dysbiosis may be caused by diseases like Nosema ceranae or by other anthropic, environmental or experimental stressors. The present work contributes to increasing knowledge on the dynamics of the gut microbiome acquisition in caged honeybees, an experimental condition frequently adopted by researchers, with or without infection with N. ceranae, and fed with a bacterial mixture to control N. ceranae development. Changes of the gut microbiota were elucidated comparing microbial profile of caged and open-field reared honeybees. The absolute abundance of the major gut microbial taxa was studied with both NGS and qPCR approaches, whereas changes in the functionality were based on RAST annotations and manually curated. In general, all caged honeybees showed important changes in the gut microbiota, with γ-proteobacteria (Frischella, Gilliamella and Snodgrassella) lacking in all caged experimental groups. Caged honeybees infected with N. ceranae showed also a strong colonization of environmental taxa like Citrobacter, Cosenzaea and Morganella, as well as possibly pathogenic bacteria such as Serratia. The colonization of Serratia did not occur in presence of the bacterial mixture. The functionality prediction revealed that environmental bacteria or the supplemented bacterial mixture increased the metabolic potential of the honeybee gut microbiome compared to field and caged controls.

Alterations in the Microbiota of Caged Honeybees in the Presence of Nosema ceranae Infection and Related Changes in Functionality

Alberoni D.
Primo
Conceptualization
;
Di Gioia D.
Secondo
Funding Acquisition
;
Baffoni L.
Ultimo
Data Curation
2022

Abstract

Several studies have outlined that changes in the honeybee gut microbial composition may impair important metabolic functions supporting the honeybees’ life. Gut dysbiosis may be caused by diseases like Nosema ceranae or by other anthropic, environmental or experimental stressors. The present work contributes to increasing knowledge on the dynamics of the gut microbiome acquisition in caged honeybees, an experimental condition frequently adopted by researchers, with or without infection with N. ceranae, and fed with a bacterial mixture to control N. ceranae development. Changes of the gut microbiota were elucidated comparing microbial profile of caged and open-field reared honeybees. The absolute abundance of the major gut microbial taxa was studied with both NGS and qPCR approaches, whereas changes in the functionality were based on RAST annotations and manually curated. In general, all caged honeybees showed important changes in the gut microbiota, with γ-proteobacteria (Frischella, Gilliamella and Snodgrassella) lacking in all caged experimental groups. Caged honeybees infected with N. ceranae showed also a strong colonization of environmental taxa like Citrobacter, Cosenzaea and Morganella, as well as possibly pathogenic bacteria such as Serratia. The colonization of Serratia did not occur in presence of the bacterial mixture. The functionality prediction revealed that environmental bacteria or the supplemented bacterial mixture increased the metabolic potential of the honeybee gut microbiome compared to field and caged controls.
Alberoni D.; Di Gioia D.; Baffoni L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/907366
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