Recent insights into the genetic and antigenic variability of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), including the discovery of two new subtypes, have renewed interest in this virus. aMPV causes a well-known respiratory disease in poultry. Domestic species show different susceptibility to aMPV subtypes, whereas sporadic detections in wild birds have revealed links between epidemiology and migration routes. To explore the epidemiology of aMPV in wild species, a molecular survey was conducted on samples that were collected from wild birds during avian influenza surveillance activity in Italy. The samples were screened in pools by multiplex real time RT-PCR assays in order to detect and differentiate subtypes A, B, C, and those that have been newly identified. All the birds were negative, except for a mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) that was positive for aMPV subtype C (sampled in Padua, in the Veneto region, in 2018). The sequencing of partial M and full G genes placed the strain in an intermediate position between European and Chinese clusters. The absence of subtypes A and B supports the negligible role of wild birds, whereas subtype C detection follows previous serological and molecular identifications in Italy. Subtype C circulation in domestic and wild populations emphasizes the importance of molecular test development and adoption to allow the prompt detection of this likely emerging subtype.

Molecular Survey on A, B, C and New Avian Metapneumovirus (aMPV) Subtypes in Wild Birds of Northern-Central Italy

Lupini C.;Catelli E.;Quaglia G.;Graziosi G.;
2022

Abstract

Recent insights into the genetic and antigenic variability of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), including the discovery of two new subtypes, have renewed interest in this virus. aMPV causes a well-known respiratory disease in poultry. Domestic species show different susceptibility to aMPV subtypes, whereas sporadic detections in wild birds have revealed links between epidemiology and migration routes. To explore the epidemiology of aMPV in wild species, a molecular survey was conducted on samples that were collected from wild birds during avian influenza surveillance activity in Italy. The samples were screened in pools by multiplex real time RT-PCR assays in order to detect and differentiate subtypes A, B, C, and those that have been newly identified. All the birds were negative, except for a mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) that was positive for aMPV subtype C (sampled in Padua, in the Veneto region, in 2018). The sequencing of partial M and full G genes placed the strain in an intermediate position between European and Chinese clusters. The absence of subtypes A and B supports the negligible role of wild birds, whereas subtype C detection follows previous serological and molecular identifications in Italy. Subtype C circulation in domestic and wild populations emphasizes the importance of molecular test development and adoption to allow the prompt detection of this likely emerging subtype.
2022
Tucciarone C.M.; Franzo G.; Legnardi M.; Pasotto D.; Lupini C.; Catelli E.; Quaglia G.; Graziosi G.; Dal Molin E.; Gobbo F.; Cecchinato M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/905016
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