Purpose: Neoplastic wounds may develop as a result of primary tumor growth in the skin, due to metastasis, or due to skin invasion by tumors emerging from deeper levels. Malignant wounds may present as a crater-like ulcer, or as raised nodules with a cauliflower-like appearance. They are associated with malodor, necrosis, pain, bleeding, and secondary infection. The aim of our study is to better characterize fungating wounds and their management. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the database of the Wound Care Unit of the University of Bologna in order to identify individuals affected by neoplastic wound, between January 2019 and February 2021. Results: We identified 9 females and 2 males with a mean age of 63 years; all were referred by the Oncology Unit. Management differed depending on the characteristics of the patients and the ulcers. Complete healing of the wound, following the parallel complete remission of the lymphoproliferative neoplasia, was observed in one individual. Among the others, one died because of breast cancer, while cutaneous lesions in 2 individuals deteriorated after 1 year of follow-up. Remission/relapse of the ulcer following the treatment course administered for the lymphoma were observed in one patient. Conclusions: Treatment of malignant fungating wounds is challenging. Considering the neoplastic nature of the wounds, complete healing or improvement cannot be expected with the application of classically prescribed dressing for wounds. A mostly palliative treatment, focusing on maintaining the patient's quality of life, is a reasonable choice.

Management of malignant cutaneous wounds in oncologic patients

Starace M;Carpanese MA;Pampaloni F;Dika E;Pileri A;Rubino D;Alessandrini A;Zamagni C;Baraldi C;Misciali C;Patrizi A;Piraccini BM
2022

Abstract

Purpose: Neoplastic wounds may develop as a result of primary tumor growth in the skin, due to metastasis, or due to skin invasion by tumors emerging from deeper levels. Malignant wounds may present as a crater-like ulcer, or as raised nodules with a cauliflower-like appearance. They are associated with malodor, necrosis, pain, bleeding, and secondary infection. The aim of our study is to better characterize fungating wounds and their management. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the database of the Wound Care Unit of the University of Bologna in order to identify individuals affected by neoplastic wound, between January 2019 and February 2021. Results: We identified 9 females and 2 males with a mean age of 63 years; all were referred by the Oncology Unit. Management differed depending on the characteristics of the patients and the ulcers. Complete healing of the wound, following the parallel complete remission of the lymphoproliferative neoplasia, was observed in one individual. Among the others, one died because of breast cancer, while cutaneous lesions in 2 individuals deteriorated after 1 year of follow-up. Remission/relapse of the ulcer following the treatment course administered for the lymphoma were observed in one patient. Conclusions: Treatment of malignant fungating wounds is challenging. Considering the neoplastic nature of the wounds, complete healing or improvement cannot be expected with the application of classically prescribed dressing for wounds. A mostly palliative treatment, focusing on maintaining the patient's quality of life, is a reasonable choice.
Starace M, Carpanese MA, Pampaloni F, Dika E, Pileri A, Rubino D, Alessandrini A, Zamagni C, Baraldi C, Misciali C, Patrizi A, Bianchi T, Apalla Z, Piraccini BM
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/902975
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