Background/aims Although an increasing volume of research is emerging, rehabilitative treatment of patients with COVID-19 still continues to be a matter of great importance that must be explored further. The purpose of the present study was to describe the effects of inpatient rehabilitation in acute patients treated in a sub-intensive hospital setting during the COVID-19 pandemic.Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted based on the prospectively collected data of 192 patients with COVID-19 undergoing a physiotherapeutic regimen during their hospitalisation. Patients were admitted because of COVID-19-related pneumonia from the periods of 25 March-12 June 2020 and 2 November 2020-9 June 2021. This study investigated dyspnoea intensity using the modified Borg scale, motor function through the 1-minute sit-to-stand test, and daily walked distance. In a subset of 57 patients, handgrip strength and respiratory muscle function was also evaluated. Measurements were taken at baseline and discharge.Results Patients were classified according to the severity of their ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen (mean 225 +/- 82 mmHg). At discharge to home or to another hospital facility, patients performed a mean of 12 repetitions (1-minute sit-to-stand test); dyspnoea intensity was 1.4 (modified Borg scale), and they were able to walk a mean distance of 266.7 metres. The mean handgrip strength of the dominant hand was 29.3 kg, the maximal inspiratory pressure was 43.5 cmH(2)O, and the maximal expiratory pressure was 59.1 cmH(2)O. Overall, significant differences before and after treatment were detected for all clinical variables. Dyspnoea improved by 0.7 points; walked distance by 200 metres; the number of repetitions at the 1-minute sit-to-stand test by 5.6; the handgrip strength by 1.2 kg (right hand) and 1.7 kg (left hand); maximal inspiratory pressure by 7.7 cmH(2)O; and maximal expiratory pressure by 9.5 cmH(2)O.Conclusions Patients obtained significant improvements in functional capacity, dyspnoea perception, handgrip strength and respiratory muscle function. In addition, the treatment was feasible and well tolerated by patients, and no adverse related events were observed in a sub-intensive care setting.

Effects of early rehabilitation on motor function, dyspnoea intensity, respiratory muscle performance and handgrip strength in patients with COVID-19: an observational study / Polastri, M; Carbonara, P; Prediletto, I; Gardini, A; Venturoli, F; Tagariello, F; Neri, L; Carpano, M; Pacilli, AMG; Nava, S. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THERAPY AND REHABILITATION. - ISSN 1741-1645. - STAMPA. - 29:8 (August)(2022), pp. 1-13. [10.12968/ijtr.2021.0169]

Effects of early rehabilitation on motor function, dyspnoea intensity, respiratory muscle performance and handgrip strength in patients with COVID-19: an observational study

Carbonara, P;Prediletto, I;Gardini, A;Venturoli, F;Tagariello, F;Neri, L;Carpano, M;Pacilli, AMG;Nava, S
2022

Abstract

Background/aims Although an increasing volume of research is emerging, rehabilitative treatment of patients with COVID-19 still continues to be a matter of great importance that must be explored further. The purpose of the present study was to describe the effects of inpatient rehabilitation in acute patients treated in a sub-intensive hospital setting during the COVID-19 pandemic.Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted based on the prospectively collected data of 192 patients with COVID-19 undergoing a physiotherapeutic regimen during their hospitalisation. Patients were admitted because of COVID-19-related pneumonia from the periods of 25 March-12 June 2020 and 2 November 2020-9 June 2021. This study investigated dyspnoea intensity using the modified Borg scale, motor function through the 1-minute sit-to-stand test, and daily walked distance. In a subset of 57 patients, handgrip strength and respiratory muscle function was also evaluated. Measurements were taken at baseline and discharge.Results Patients were classified according to the severity of their ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen (mean 225 +/- 82 mmHg). At discharge to home or to another hospital facility, patients performed a mean of 12 repetitions (1-minute sit-to-stand test); dyspnoea intensity was 1.4 (modified Borg scale), and they were able to walk a mean distance of 266.7 metres. The mean handgrip strength of the dominant hand was 29.3 kg, the maximal inspiratory pressure was 43.5 cmH(2)O, and the maximal expiratory pressure was 59.1 cmH(2)O. Overall, significant differences before and after treatment were detected for all clinical variables. Dyspnoea improved by 0.7 points; walked distance by 200 metres; the number of repetitions at the 1-minute sit-to-stand test by 5.6; the handgrip strength by 1.2 kg (right hand) and 1.7 kg (left hand); maximal inspiratory pressure by 7.7 cmH(2)O; and maximal expiratory pressure by 9.5 cmH(2)O.Conclusions Patients obtained significant improvements in functional capacity, dyspnoea perception, handgrip strength and respiratory muscle function. In addition, the treatment was feasible and well tolerated by patients, and no adverse related events were observed in a sub-intensive care setting.
2022
Effects of early rehabilitation on motor function, dyspnoea intensity, respiratory muscle performance and handgrip strength in patients with COVID-19: an observational study / Polastri, M; Carbonara, P; Prediletto, I; Gardini, A; Venturoli, F; Tagariello, F; Neri, L; Carpano, M; Pacilli, AMG; Nava, S. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THERAPY AND REHABILITATION. - ISSN 1741-1645. - STAMPA. - 29:8 (August)(2022), pp. 1-13. [10.12968/ijtr.2021.0169]
Polastri, M; Carbonara, P; Prediletto, I; Gardini, A; Venturoli, F; Tagariello, F; Neri, L; Carpano, M; Pacilli, AMG; Nava, S
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/897554
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