One of the most critical greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is carbon dioxide (CO2) due to its long-lasting and negative impact on climate change. The global atmospheric monthly mean CO2 concentration is currently greater than 410 ppm which has changed dramatically since the industrial era. To choose suitable climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies it is necessary to define carbon dioxide mass distribution and global atmospheric carbon dioxide mass. The available method to estimate the global atmospheric CO2 mass was proposed in 1980. In this study, to increase the accuracy of the available method, various observation platforms such as groundbased stations, ground-based tall towers, aircrafts, balloons, ships, and satellites are compared to define the best available observations, considering the temporal and spatial resolution. In the method proposed in this study, satellite observations (OCO2 data), from January 2019 to December 2021, are used to estimate atmospheric CO2 mass. The global atmospheric CO2 mass is estimated around 3.24*10^15 kg in 2021. For the sake of comparison, global atmospheric CO2 mass was estimated by Fraser’s method using NOAA data for the mentioned study period. The proposed methodology in this study estimated slightly greater amounts of CO2 in comparison to Fraser’s method. This comparison resulted in 1.23% and 0.15% maximum and average difference, respectively, between the proposed method and Fraser’s method. The proposed method can be used to estimate the required capacity of systems for carbon capturing and can be applied to smaller districts to find the most critical locations in the world to plan for climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Modification of Fraser's Method for the Atmospheric CO2 Mass Estimation by Using Satellite Data

Marco Pellegrini;Arash Aghakhani;Alessandro Guzzini
;
Cesare Saccani
2022

Abstract

One of the most critical greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is carbon dioxide (CO2) due to its long-lasting and negative impact on climate change. The global atmospheric monthly mean CO2 concentration is currently greater than 410 ppm which has changed dramatically since the industrial era. To choose suitable climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies it is necessary to define carbon dioxide mass distribution and global atmospheric carbon dioxide mass. The available method to estimate the global atmospheric CO2 mass was proposed in 1980. In this study, to increase the accuracy of the available method, various observation platforms such as groundbased stations, ground-based tall towers, aircrafts, balloons, ships, and satellites are compared to define the best available observations, considering the temporal and spatial resolution. In the method proposed in this study, satellite observations (OCO2 data), from January 2019 to December 2021, are used to estimate atmospheric CO2 mass. The global atmospheric CO2 mass is estimated around 3.24*10^15 kg in 2021. For the sake of comparison, global atmospheric CO2 mass was estimated by Fraser’s method using NOAA data for the mentioned study period. The proposed methodology in this study estimated slightly greater amounts of CO2 in comparison to Fraser’s method. This comparison resulted in 1.23% and 0.15% maximum and average difference, respectively, between the proposed method and Fraser’s method. The proposed method can be used to estimate the required capacity of systems for carbon capturing and can be applied to smaller districts to find the most critical locations in the world to plan for climate change mitigation and adaptation.
Marco Pellegrini; Arash Aghakhani; Alessandro Guzzini; Cesare Saccani
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/893225
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