It is estimated that over 400 million people worldwide experience some form of urinary incontinence (UI). Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is commonly used in cases of urine loss. Game therapy (GT) has been suggested as a new conservative modality for UI treatments. GT represents a form of virtual reality (VR) that allows users to interact with elements of a simulated scenario. The purpose of this review was to assess the potential of using VR-based PFMT in the treatment of UI with a particular focus on the impact of this form of therapy on the patients’ muscle function, symptoms of UI and quality of life (QoL). The following electronic databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus and Web of Science. Systematic review methods were based on the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Electronic medical databases were searched from inception to 28 January 2021. From a total of 38 articles, 26 were analyzed after removing duplicates, then 22 records were excluded according to inclusion criteria and 4 were assessed as full texts. Finally, 2 randomized controlled trials (RCT) with 79 patients were included. For the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), the meta-analysis showed a significant difference in favor of the control condition (MD = 2.22; 95% CI 0.42, 4.01; I2 = 0%). Despite the popularity of the use of VR in rehabilitation, we found a scarcity of literature evaluating the application of VR in the field of UI therapy. Only one study matched all of the criteria established. The effects of VR training improved PFM function and QoL; however, these changes were comparable to those of traditional PFMT. It is not possible to reach final conclusions from one study; thus, further development of VR interventions in the field of UI treatments are needed.

Use of Virtual Reality-Based Therapy in Patients with Urinary Incontinence: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

Turolla A.
2022

Abstract

It is estimated that over 400 million people worldwide experience some form of urinary incontinence (UI). Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is commonly used in cases of urine loss. Game therapy (GT) has been suggested as a new conservative modality for UI treatments. GT represents a form of virtual reality (VR) that allows users to interact with elements of a simulated scenario. The purpose of this review was to assess the potential of using VR-based PFMT in the treatment of UI with a particular focus on the impact of this form of therapy on the patients’ muscle function, symptoms of UI and quality of life (QoL). The following electronic databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus and Web of Science. Systematic review methods were based on the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Electronic medical databases were searched from inception to 28 January 2021. From a total of 38 articles, 26 were analyzed after removing duplicates, then 22 records were excluded according to inclusion criteria and 4 were assessed as full texts. Finally, 2 randomized controlled trials (RCT) with 79 patients were included. For the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), the meta-analysis showed a significant difference in favor of the control condition (MD = 2.22; 95% CI 0.42, 4.01; I2 = 0%). Despite the popularity of the use of VR in rehabilitation, we found a scarcity of literature evaluating the application of VR in the field of UI therapy. Only one study matched all of the criteria established. The effects of VR training improved PFM function and QoL; however, these changes were comparable to those of traditional PFMT. It is not possible to reach final conclusions from one study; thus, further development of VR interventions in the field of UI treatments are needed.
Rutkowska A.; Salvalaggio S.; Rutkowski S.; Turolla A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/891975
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